Tagged "Ask a Therapist"


Ask A Therapist: 17 year old with Autism

Posted by Deborah Grauzam on

Hi, 

 

My son is 17 and has Autism. He has received speech services since he was 2.8 months old. The most successful therapy has been PROMPT for him. Currently he has 3 therapists working with him. One specializes in PROMPT, the other specializes with his talker device and the other is on the team. My son rarely uses his talker which he acquired about 3 years ago. He basically uses one word to meet his wants.  Unknown people can't understand him. He has hypotonia. He drops off the ending of his words. We recently (Fall of 2015) brought back PROMPT therapist as his speech was regressing with traditional imitative speech therapy. He was saying the /sh/ sound for the /s/ sound and we were having trouble getting the retraction.  Would the horn program help and if so how? And could I do it as a parent? I use PROMPT with my son to correct the /s/ as in yes, but I am not using PROMPT extensively as the SLP is in therapy.

 

Thanks for your advice.

 

Gina

 

Hi Gina,

I am a speech language pathologist who is trained in Prompt as well as TalkTools. I often use the two together for many of the patients I see. I feel they are two approaches that often help my patients with difficulty with verbal communication. I think it is great that you are considering pursuing both for your son. I would encourage you to try to find a TalkTools trained therapist in your area to evaluate your son and create a program plan for you to follow if that is available. You can do it all yourself but you would need to watch the video A Three-Part Treatment Plan for Oral Placement Therapy and follow the directions included in your kit. The horns would work on tongue retraction as well as the Bubble Kit and straw drinking. I often use these activities together with patients working on tongue retraction.

Please let me know if you have any other questions.

I am happy to help.

Thanks,

Liz

 

Elizabeth Smithson, MSP, CCC-SLP is a Speech-Language Pathologist who has over 10 years of professional experience working with infants, children, adolescents and adults. She earned her Master of Speech Pathology at the University of South Carolina. Liz is also a Level 5 TalkTools® Trained Therapist. She has received specialized training in Oral Placement Therapy, Speech, Feeding, Apraxia, Sensory Processing Disorders, and PROMPT©. Liz works with clients with a wide range of disabilities including Cerebral Palsy, Down Syndrome, and Spinal Muscular Atrophy. She works through her own private practice Elizabeth Smithson Therapy, LLC in the home setting and in the TalkTools® office in Charleston, SC.

Read more →

Ask A Therapist: Sensory Friendly Bite Blocks

Posted by Deborah Grauzam on

Hi, 

 

I have two questions for you.

 

1. I have lost some pieces of my Sensory Friendly Bite Blocks set and would like to purchase another set. Since the purple sticks are softer than the red ones, many students chewed them thin so that their bite marks are visible in the stick. My question is: should I purchase the red set to avoid that problem or purchase another purple set so that in the event that should any stick get lost, I may have the replacement?

 

2. There are students on my caseload who simply have lingual protrusion for the all alveolar sounds. My question is: if I purchase the Straw Kit for these articulation students, will that help them eliminate their tongue thrust along with standard articulation therapy? Do the straws truly help train the retraction of tongues?

 

Thanks so much,

 

Chayie

 

Hi Chayie,

1. As far as the red and purple bite blocks go I have a set of both. I always try to use the red first because they are more durable and then use the purple if the client does not tolerate them. Many of my clients prefer the texture of the purple so I just know I have to replace those more frequently.

2. Yes, the straws do work on tongue retraction orally. They work on different levels of tongue retraction.  There is a diagram that will come in the straw kit and is also in the book that shows exactly where the retraction takes place with each individual straw. The Horn Kit and the Bubble Kit are two other activities that I often do while working on the straws for tongue retraction. These are all great!

Let me know if you have any other questions.

Always happy to help.

Thanks,

Liz

 

Elizabeth Smithson, MSP, CCC-SLP is a Speech-Language Pathologist who has over 10 years of professional experience working with infants, children, adolescents and adults. She earned her Master of Speech Pathology at the University of South Carolina. Liz is also a Level 5 TalkTools® Trained Therapist. She has received specialized training in Oral Placement Therapy, Speech, Feeding, Apraxia, Sensory Processing Disorders, and PROMPT©. Liz works with clients with a wide range of disabilities including Cerebral Palsy, Down Syndrome, and Spinal Muscular Atrophy. She works through her own private practice Elizabeth Smithson Therapy, LLC in the home setting and in the TalkTools® office in Charleston, SC.

Read more →

Ask A Therapist: A good start for a child with Down Syndrome

Posted by Deborah Grauzam on

Hi there, my daughter is 2.5 years old, she has Down syndrome. We live in New Zealand. Can you please let me know what you would recommend for her? She is making sounds and attempting to say a few words. She uses sign language - and has approx 30 signs. Her tongue protrudes every now and then. She has no dribbling issues.

 

Thank you,

 

Cassy

 

Hi Cassy,

I would start with the videos: "Developing Oral Sensory Motor Skills to Support Feeding in the Down Syndrome Population" and "A Three Part Treatment Plan for Oral Placement Therapy". These will help you get the clear understanding of how to do TalkTools Therapy with your child if there is not a trained therapist available. The Parent Kit would be a good place to start as far as tools go to use with your child. You will probably need more in the near future but I think that is a good place to start.  

Please let us know if you have any other questions.

Thanks,

Liz

 

Elizabeth Smithson, MSP, CCC-SLP is a Speech-Language Pathologist who has over 10 years of professional experience working with infants, children, adolescents and adults. She earned her Master of Speech Pathology at the University of South Carolina. Liz is also a Level 5 TalkTools® Trained Therapist. She has received specialized training in Oral Placement Therapy, Speech, Feeding, Apraxia, Sensory Processing Disorders, and PROMPT©. Liz works with clients with a wide range of disabilities including Cerebral Palsy, Down Syndrome, and Spinal Muscular Atrophy. She works through her own private practice Elizabeth Smithson Therapy, LLC in the home setting and in the TalkTools® office in Charleston, SC.

Read more →

Ask A Therapist: Straw Length

Posted by Deborah Grauzam on

Hi Guys!

 

I have a couple of questions. First of all, I am utilizing Sara Rosenfeld-Johnson's Drooling Remediation Program and OPT on a 2.2 year old for drooling. Dad is a dentist and is totally on board. Their little guy is a twin and has three other siblings. The little guy has progressed to straw #5 and although he struggled with horn #4, he has now successfully moved on to horn #5. Mom is very unhappy with the length/height of the straws ... I have explained 'calibration' of each straw to her. Is there anything else I can say to appease this busy mom? We are also needing some help writing up the report for insurance purposes. I purchased the "Forms for Oral Placement and Treatment" CD, thinking that it would contain that type of helpful information. Insurance can be so persnickety!

 

I am also trying to get insurance to cover services for a 10 month old with Down Syndrome that I have screened for services. He is being seen through ECI, has not feeding issues currently but would benefit from OPT!

 

I have been working with a 27 year old with Down Syndrome very successfully! Her parents are amazed and thrilled!

 

Thank you for any information you can provide that will assist me in helping my clients!

 

Sincerely,

 

Kellie

 

Hi Kellie,

It sounds like you have done a great job explaining the straws and how to use them to this mom. The only other idea I have would be to encourage her to put the straw in the large TalkTools cup with lid and have the curly part of the straw under the lid. That sometimes helps if it is tipping or they are playing with it. I just try to explain that the straw is working on tongue retraction in the mouth at different levels. It is important that they are that particular length because that is what makes them more difficult and requires more work for the tongue and lips.

As far as the insurance billing, I personally do not bill insurance but there is a CD called "OPT Goals & Objectives for IEPs and Insurance Reimbursement" that will help with goals and objectives for insurance reimbursement and IEPs. It does not include coding but it should help with what you are talking about. It sounded like it was more of what you were looking for than the CD you mentioned.

Good luck with the mom you are working with and please let me know if you have any other questions.

Thanks,

Liz

 

 

Elizabeth Smithson, MSP, CCC-SLP is a Speech-Language Pathologist who has over 10 years of professional experience working with infants, children, adolescents and adults. She earned her Master of Speech Pathology at the University of South Carolina. Liz is also a Level 5 TalkTools® Trained Therapist. She has received specialized training in Oral Placement Therapy, Speech, Feeding, Apraxia, Sensory Processing Disorders, and PROMPT©. Liz works with clients with a wide range of disabilities including Cerebral Palsy, Down Syndrome, and Spinal Muscular Atrophy. She works through her own private practice Elizabeth Smithson Therapy, LLC in the home setting and in the TalkTools® office in Charleston, SC.

Read more →

Ask A Therapist: Blue Chewy Tube

Posted by Deborah Grauzam on

Hi TalkTools,

 

I have a new patient who is 2 years and 7 months old. His tactile system is not organized at this time. He has bit chunks out of his crib. I recommended the blue Chewy Tube to help give him the prop he is seeking; however, his mom said he throws it. He enjoys biting the red Chewy Tube. Should I recommend she allows him to use the red to chew in spite of it being a therapy tool?

 

I look forward to your response. Thank you for having a question based email account. It is such a beneficial service.

 

Amy

 

Hi Amy,

I would not recommend him chewing on the red Chewy Tube on his own. What I would recommend is having the mom do his chewing exercises that you recommend multiple times a day when he is seeking that input (ex: he will chew on the red Chewy Tube 6 times on both sides). I know it is a huge commitment on her part but this will help strengthen his jaw while giving him the sensory input he is seeking. I would explore other chewing items that he might like and let him control those, but not the red. 

I hope this helps.

Let me know if you have other questions.

Thanks,

Liz

 

Elizabeth Smithson, MSP, CCC-SLP is a Speech-Language Pathologist who has over 10 years of professional experience working with infants, children, adolescents and adults. She earned her Master of Speech Pathology at the University of South Carolina. Liz is also a Level 5 TalkTools® Trained Therapist. She has received specialized training in Oral Placement Therapy, Speech, Feeding, Apraxia, Sensory Processing Disorders, and PROMPT©. Liz works with clients with a wide range of disabilities including Cerebral Palsy, Down Syndrome, and Spinal Muscular Atrophy.  She works through her own private practice Elizabeth Smithson Therapy, LLC in the home setting and in the TalkTools® office in Charleston, SC.

Read more →
script type="text/javascript" src="//downloads.mailchimp.com/js/signup-forms/popup/unique-methods/embed.js" data-dojo-config="usePlainJson: true, isDebug: false">