Tagged "honey bear"


Ask A Therapist: A client bites down on baby bottle

Posted by Deborah Grauzam on

Hello! 

 

My name is Yael and I have a patient who is 18 months, has low tone in the oral area, likes a lot of sensory input inside the mouth but won't suck on a straw or drink from a cup. He only drinks from a baby bottle and kind of bites down on it. How can I start working on his suckling skills so I can work with the straws and all the other tools?

 

Thank you!

 

Yael

 

Hi Yael,

I will give you a number of things to try and see what works for your patient.  I would work on providing a good sensory warm up with the Vibrator & Toothette, chewing on gloved finger, using the z-vibe, or red Chewy Tube (depends on where your client is with jaw strength). I would question if your patient has jaw weakness based on your description.  You can also try rocking the bottle in and out of the mouth to encourage more of a front/ back pattern versus the up/ down biting. Then I would try to use the Honey Bear with Flexible Straw to encourage drinking.  You will load the straw for the patient and provide jaw and cheeks support if needed. I hope some of this helps.

Please let me know if you have any other questions. We are happy to help.

Thanks,

Liz

 

Elizabeth Smithson, MSP, CCC-SLP is a Speech-Language Pathologist who has over 10 years of professional experience working with infants, children, adolescents and adults. She earned her Master of Speech Pathology at the University of South Carolina. Liz is also a Level 5 TalkTools® Trained Therapist. She has received specialized training in Oral Placement Therapy, Speech, Feeding, Apraxia, Sensory Processing Disorders, and PROMPT©. Liz works with clients with a wide range of disabilities including Cerebral Palsy, Down Syndrome, and Spinal Muscular Atrophy. She works through her own private practice Elizabeth Smithson Therapy, LLC in the home setting and in the TalkTools® office in Charleston, SC.

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Ask A Therapist: 7 year old with Down Syndrome who can't drink

Posted by Deborah Grauzam on

My son who has Down Syndrome will be seven next month and still can't drink.

 

Ben had a high palate and was breastfed. He really latched with his tongue. He only drinks from a hard spout sippy cup. He grinds his teeth really bad too. But he still uses his tongue, even as he drinks from the sippy cup. You can see his tongue out on the bottom of the sippy cup, it's like his sucking reflex is so strong his brain won't let him not use his tongue to suck! He doesn't stick his tongue out and it's not a thick tongue either. We have tried the honey bear and tubing as well, he just wants to use his tongue! Any suggestions on how to help my little guy?

 

Thank you!

 

Robin

Hi Robin,

It sounds like your son is still demonstrating what we call a "suckle pattern" when drinking. If he is not able to drink from the honey bear straw cup at all, I would recommend that you consult a TalkTools Trained Therapist to have an evaluation and get more information on how to work on straw drinking with your child. There is a strategy of using a syringe to place small amounts of liquid in his cheeks by his back molars but I feel this technique would be best implemented by someone with experience, who can guide you through the process. If that is not an option, I would watch Sara Rosenfeld-Johnson's video-on-demand "A Three-Part Treatment Plan for Oral Placement Therapy" and try to teach yourself before implementing the techniques with your son. Please let me know if we can help you with anything else.

Thanks,

Liz

 

Elizabeth Smithson, MSP, CCC-SLP is a Speech-Language Pathologist who has over 10 years of professional experience working with infants, children, adolescents and adults. She earned her Master of Speech Pathology at the University of South Carolina. Liz is also a Level 5 TalkTools® Trained Therapist. She has received specialized training in Oral Placement Therapy, Speech, Feeding, Apraxia, Sensory Processing Disorders, and PROMPT©. Liz works with clients with a wide range of disabilities including Cerebral Palsy, Down Syndrome, and Spinal Muscular Atrophy.  She works through her own private practice Elizabeth Smithson Therapy, LLC in the home setting and in the TalkTools® office in Charleston, SC.

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Ask A Therapist: Straw Drinking

Posted by Deborah Grauzam on

Hello TalkTools,

 

I feel so defeated. My son is 2 years old and I can't get him to master straw drinking. He is an otherwise high-functioning, very successful child. He is starting to walk, can build with blocks ... What am I doing wrong?

 

David has Down Syndrome. (He has repaired cardiac defect, which thankfully has not been causing him any issues.) I find that he is very sensitive in the mouth. he is nervous to put anything in his mouth that he is not familiar with. I find him to be more motivated by familiarity (i.e. familiar foods) than special tastes. I tried putting all different juices in his mouth to get him to want to suck up but he is annoyed with the task.

 

Right now, my therapist suggested that I try using a large chocolate syringe ( it's an over sized syringe kids love to pour chocolate in their mouth!) which hopefully, will motivate him to suck the tip.

 

I am scheduled to see Lori Overland in November but I would love to get some tips now already.

 

Miriam

 

Hi Miriam,

I'm Whitney, a TalkTools® Instructor. Thanks for your email regarding your son. Please know you are not doing anything wrong. Often times straw drinking is very difficult to teach so be patient. I am very encouraged that you are scheduled to see Lori Overland in a few weeks. Hands on approach is so much better than any suggestions I can give you without getting my hands on your child.  

For now I would use the honey bear to teach this technique and add a highly flavored favorite liquid. I would also recommend to make the consistency a little thicker than water to help with tolerating this new motor skill. I often use a favorite yogurt or pudding and add water.   For now I would just continue to get acceptance of the honey bear and the straw to his mouth. Do not continue to push it if he becomes easily frustrated as we want to be able to address this skill when you see Lori Overland.  

Please let me know if you have any other questions.  

Thanks,

Whitney B. Pimentel MA, CCC-SLP

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Ask a Therapist: Feeding after attending the Feeding course

Posted by Deborah Grauzam on

Hi Lori,

I attended your Feeding Therapy: Sensory Motor Approach 2 day course.  It was terrific and I’ve been implementing a lot of what I learned.  I’ve seen some progress already.  One of my students did such a great job drinking from a straw the other day! What an improvement from the liquid being squeezed into her mouth.  Now we have to work on transitioning to the classroom. ****Excellent! I always love to hear that!!!!****   Other students have been slower going and that’s one of my questions. 

One particular student is 14 years old.  She basically has a soft diet mostly consisting of sweet puddings and cakes with some fruits.  She manages those foods though she is definitely giving the OT trouble with self feeding and the behaviorist has suggested pairing eating with a pleasurable activity which is the IPAD.  So while she’s on the IPAD she will usually feed herself. 

She has a protruded jaw, her upper lip is pulled in, her tongue is bunchy and her cheeks are “puffy”.  Her teeth are a bit crooked and somewhat misplaced.  I’ve seen some nice movement and closure of the lips.  She also accepts the tongue massage.  I’ve tried the chewy tube and she will tolerate it in her mouth, but I haven’t seen any movement towards a bite.  That’s where I’m not sure what to do?  I model.  We have a mirror; I support her jaw but no change.  She bites on her shirt and a bib that she wears into school.  Any suggestions on how to move forward?  

****Well.....if you are working on straw drinking you really need to get cheek contraction, lip rounding and tongue retraction. You may have to focus on  a pre-feeding program before you introduce the honey bear. From your description of her puffy cheeks, upper lip pulled in, tongue bunchy.... she does not have the skills to successfully straw drink. THEN.... work corner to corner with the honey bear...one sip/one swallow !****

I have feeding objectives on many of my students IEPs.  I usually write the criteria as a level of participation because I’m not sure how else to measure the data for the IEP and don’t want to get myself stuck.  I’m also trying to track progress so I’ve developed a data sheet listing the exercises and how many times they have been done.  It seems ok, but I feel there must be a better way.  Do you have any suggestions regarding that?

****I work in many schools and it is amazing how different districts require tracking of progress. Some are so general....they are meaningless, and some get down to how many sips with lip rounding, cheek contraction and tongue retraction. SOOOO....I write my plans to develop the skill and let the schools figure out how they need to record data, and track progress. Sorry I can't be more helpful on that one...****

Wow, I guess I saved up a bunch of stuff.  I hope it is all clear.  I’ve been lucky to get to stay with my current caseload and I see oral motor and feeding therapy as a big part of our treatment  Any suggestions if you are able would be great.  I’d love to continue to learn more as I find this particular area to be really interesting and so important.  ****Good for you! It sounds like you have already done some nice work...and seen the progress your students are capable of making. ****

I look forward to hearing from you!  Have a great day. B

****Thanks again for the great questions!

Lori Overland****

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Ask a Therapist: Speech and language delay with the Straw and Horn Kits

Posted by Deborah Grauzam on

Hello! I am Maria and I live in Singapore. I have just purchased the parent kit and started with the Horn #1 and have not seen any major problem so far. I am concerned about the Straw #1. When I started my son (he has some speech and language delay), he seemed to stop learning how to drink with a straw. Well, he could use a normal staw before - but with biting, but when he uses the Straw #1, he tries to bite and no longer sips - when he was able to bite and sip on normal straws before. Do you think I must start with a pre-requisite tool before Straw #1? I am helping him straw with the support of my hand but to no avail.

Thank you,

Maria

Sometimes changing the straw texture can be difficult if they've been using a motor plan for one that can not transition to another. My suggestion would be to use the Honey Bear with straw that has a flexible tubing that is firm but not completely stiff. It is designed so that if he cannot initiate the suck easily, you can squeeze the cup and help him learn the motor plan without biting. Providing jaw support can help. Once he is independent on the Honey Bear with Straw, you can again transition to Straw #1.

Your local TalkTools distributor may be able to help you find a local therapist with TalkTools training who can better assess and monitor your son's therapy.

I hope this helps!

Renee Roy Hill

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