Tagged "lip closure"


Ask A Therapist: Task Analyzing Oral Sensory Motor Skills

Posted by Deborah Grauzam on

Hi Lori,

I have a 7 months old client who is a breast feeder. When trying to give her new things like applesauce, yogurt, etc. She makes the bolus but she doesn't swallow. What can I do for her to swallow, besides achieving lip closure? Specifically for swallowing. I hope you can help me. Thank you.

Rosy

Hi Rosy,

I wish it was as easy as just making recommendations for treatment ... but your treatment needs to be based upon assessment. You need to look at this child's medical issues (does this baby have respiratory issues, gut issues, allergies, etc? What is the primary diagnosis?), tone, posture and alignment issues (what you see in the body is what you get in the mouth), sensory system (is this a baby who has modulation, regulation or sensory discrimination issues?), oral structures (have you looked at the shape of the palate, the labial frenum, lingual frenulum, etc?) and then do a task analysis of oral sensory motor skills (you can task analyze any motor skill) to support safe nutritive feeding. Once you can target WHY this child is having difficulty managing purees, it will be appropriate to plan a program or to ask for suggestions for program planning. The two-day sensory motor class or the sensory motor feeding book may be helpful. Best,

Lori Overland, MS, CCC-SLP, C/NDT

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Ask A Therapist: The right duration of vibration

Posted by Deborah Grauzam on

Hello!

 

I have a question about using vibration (as with the Z-Vibe or Vibrator & Toothettes). I understand that using vibration can be used to "wake up" the sensory system, and I believe I’ve heard that it can have a temporarily positive effect on low muscle tone. I’ve read that vibration should be used in short durations, but I was wondering if you had any guidelines for the maximum or minimum duration of vibration? I’m thinking especially in a case of low muscle tone as in children with Down syndrome.

 

Thank you very much!

 

Jennifer

 

Hi Jennifer,

My name is Lori Overland and I teach the two day sensory-motor feeding class for TalkTools. Your email was forwarded to me, and it is an excellent question.

You cannot separate out the sensory and motor systems. Sensory feedback always impacts movement and movement provides feedback. It is important to make sure you have a specific motor goal (i.e.: in the case of spoon feeding, perhaps the goal is lip closure). Vibration facilitates a contraction of the muscle, so it may be used in conjunction with a tool to facilitate upper lip mobility for spoon feeding. If you leave vibration on a muscle for too long, the muscle relaxes. If you are using my pre-feeding exercises, I recommend  4-5 repetitions (maybe a little more or less depending on my client's sensory system) of an exercise. If you think about your motor goal and map sensory on to motor, you will not have to be concerned about using too much vibration. Feel free to email me if you have a follow up question.

Lori

 

Lori Overland, MS, CCC-SLP is a speech and language pathologist with more than 35 years of professional experience. Lori specializes in dealing with the unique needs of infants, toddlers, pre-schoolers and school-aged children with oral sensory-motor, feeding and oral placement/speech disorders. She has received an award from the Connecticut Down Syndrome Association for her work within this population. Lori consults with children from all over the world, providing evaluations, re-evaluations, program plans and week-long therapy programs. Lori also provides consults to local school districts and Birth-to-Three organizations. Her goal in addressing feeding and speech challenges is to improve the quality of life for both the children she serves and their families. In addition to her private practice, Alphabet Soup, Lori is a member of the TalkTools® speakers bureau. Lori has lectured on sensory-motor feeding disorders across the United States and internationally. Her classes, "Feeding Therapy: A Sensory-Motor Approach" and "Developing Oral-Motor Feeding Skills in the Down Syndrome Population" are approved for ASHA and AOTA CEUs. Lori is the co-author of A Sensory Motor Approach to Feeding. She holds degrees from Horfstra University and Adelphi University and has her neurodevelopmental certification.

Meet her!

- Oct. 14-15, 2016 for the workshop Feeding Therapy: A Sensory-Motor Approach in Cape Giraudoux, MO

- Oct. 29-30, 2016 for the workshop Feeding Therapy: A Sensory-Motor Approach in Minneapolis, MN

More dates at: TalkTools.com/Workshops

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Ask A Therapist: 3 year old with Moebius Syndrome

Posted by Deborah Grauzam on

You all have been amazing when I have asked for help with my students, so I have another question. I have just evaluated a 3 ½ year old who was diagnosed at birth with Moebius Syndrome. Although I have had difficulty finding information about this syndrome, I managed to find an article Sara Rosenfeld-Johnson wrote that was extremely helpful and plan to follow her recommendations. My main concern right now is that a Haberman bottle was used to feed him, so now he clamps his teeth down on the flute and straw when I try to work with him. Is there any tool that is beneficial to inhibiting the teeth biting and promoting the normal suck and swallow and blowing? And if you have any other references for oral motor therapy related to damage to the 7th cranial nerve I would appreciate it. THANK YOU!!!!!!   Thank you for the compliment and the question.  I have worked with Sara and the Moebius population for the past 10 years and hope I can help with your question!

 

The clamping of the teeth is common since the primary problem we are working with is the inability to close the lips.  So this is very common with most of the children and adults we work with.  The key initially is to make the mouthpiece big enough to fit into the current lip opening.  To determine if this is even appropriate to begin, you need to know if the client has paralysis or paresis.  If you have seen any upper facial movement, flutters or twitches then you are looking at paresis and working on these skills may improve lip and cheek function.  Here is a basic outline of what you might do with straw and horn blowing; both a part of a complete oral placement program that would also address any deficits in jaw stability as you are trying to achieve lip from jaw dissociation (I can give you more information on that if you would like):

1st:  Begin by using the TalkTools vibrator and trimmed Toothette (the vibration is the key) under the upper lip and in the cheeks to provide sensation to the muscles. This would be done for 1-2 minutes and therapy activities would then follow.

2nd:  Horn Blowing:  Measure the lip opening when the child is in a resting lip posture, or if possible, trying to close his lips on command.  You may begin with Horn #1 if they have the breath support and skill but also may want to start with the Alex Tub Flute (TalkTools has begun carrying them but you will need to check availability).  This horn is easier to blow and has a wider mouthpiece.  If you use Horn #1, wrap the tip of the horn in medical tape several times until the mouthpiece measures the lip open position.  This will allow you to then support the jaw with your non-dominant hand and place the horn between the lips, rather than the teeth (the pre-requisite is that they know to exhale on command).  Using the TalkTools Progressive Jaw Closure Tubes is also helpful in teaching this skill.  As they meet the criteria, you can unwrap the horn mouthpiece one time and repeat until you have removed all the tape.  The lip, assuming there is the ability to gain movement will follow with practice.

3rd:  Straw drinking:  I would suggest starting with the Honey Bear with Flexible Straw.  There is a program Sara and I wrote several years ago called the Ice Sticks Program that has a technique using a syringe to teach a client to retract the tongue and swallow.  This same program can also be used with Moebius Syndrome with the goal of teaching the child to “slurp and swallow”.  You can use the Honey Bear following the same principles as the syringe technique to place the straw in the buccal cavity, squeeze and then tell the child to slurp.  You would need to ensure he is not biting on the straw (support with your non-dominant hand if needed) and that the tongue is retracted (you will often see the tongue protrude between the central incisors as an additional compensatory strategy if tongue retraction is difficult for them.  As they learn to “slurp” the liquid you have squeezed into the cheek, it activates the cheek, lip and tongue muscles, eventually leading to the child's ability to “slurp” the straw on their own.  There are several steps to teach this and I’m happy to share more detail if you need it as well!

I would also encourage you to visit the Moebius Foundation website.  Our past presentations should be available for you to view and may be helpful as well.

I hope this gets you started!  Clients with Moebius Syndrome are a joy to work with once you have the appropriate tools and starting point!  We’ve had great success with many individuals using these techniques!

Thank you,

Renee Roy Hill, MS, CCC-SLP

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Ask a Therapist: Cleft Palate and Feeding Therapy

Posted by Deborah Grauzam on

Lori,

I've taken your courses for Down's syndrome and Assessment and Planning. I'm fairly new to feeding, but am having some success with Down's clients (thank you and they thank you :).

I just got a 15 month old with cleft on my caseload.  He's had lip repair and his palate only has a small hole after surgery (will be fixed at 3).  His mother said she used a squirt bottle because he couldn't suck (and still uses it before he goes to bed).  He can drink from a cup without spilling if it only has a tiny amount in it.  Is there any reason this child could not start using a straw or have more control with a cup with intervention?  His upper lip has no movement for retraction or protrusion, but he does get closure for the /m/ sound.

Thanks

Hi,

Thanks for your email. I am so glad you have been using what you learned in the Down syndrome class with success! You should absolutely start working on upper lip mobility and lip rounding with this child!  You may have to work through the scar tissue, and I have found that a vibrating upper lip stretch (one gloved finger under the scar, one outside the lip on top, use a vibrating movement with your fingers through the scar tissue) or a myofascial release.  Then do your upper lip stretch, and mickey mouse /m/. Once you get mobility, start doing single sip cup drinking.

Best of luck and let me know how your client progresses!

Lori Overland

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Ask a Therapist: Sensory Processing assistance with a client that has Down syndrome

Posted by Deborah Grauzam on

Hi Lori,
 
I am a speech pathologist working with Toddlers. A few years ago I attended your conference on feeding therapy. I haven’t had to use a lot of the techniques up until now, so I am a little rusty.  I currently have a little guy with Down syndrome who is not chewing a great deal. His mom told me that at home she is noticing a great deal of gagging and sometimes vomiting because of this. We have been trying different textures; however, nothing seems to be working. He is also pretty resistant to chewy tubes and allows them in his mouth for only a short time. He either lets go or will bite down and not let go. I have been looking at the chewing hierarchy, but tools are listed (e.g., z-vibe, etc.) that I can’t remember exactly what I am supposed to do with. Do you have any suggestions on how to target this or where to start? Thank you so much for your help. I appreciate it!
 

Hello and thank you for the questions.

As often occurs, I have a bunch of questions to start.

Does this little one have other sensory issues?  Is there an OT who specializes in sensory processing involved?  Have you made observations about what this little one is doing with his lips, cheeks and tongue (for purees, and for solids).

I would assume (based on the diagnosis) that you should probably be working on cheek mobility and bilabial closure for spoon, cup etc.  If a protrusion/retraction is the primary tongue movement, work on tongue lateralization.  Does the child tolerate vibration?  If so, use the vibe fine tip for the lateral tongue massage.  Try the vibe bite and chew XL head (looks like a yellow chewy tube) if he will not tolerate chewy tubes.  You may want to go outside the box and roll the tool from the lateral incisor to the first molar if this child does not like the tool on the molar ridge. By the way, I have just written a book which should be out in June if you need a review of the class (and updated exercises!!!!).

Best,

Lori Overland

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