Tagged "low muscle tone"


Ask A Therapist: Persons with DS have larger tongues?

Posted by Deborah Grauzam on

Hi,

I work for a not for profit helping connect families to community resources. I just attended an appointment with a mother and 3 month old infant with Down Syndrome at the child's Family Physician's office. When the mother made the statement that she feels like her child is choking on its tongue and asked if this would change, the doctor told the mother that persons with DS have larger tongues and hopefully as her child grows his mouth would grow. 

​***This is just not true. Low muscle tone may make the tongue appear to be enlarged but tongues of people with a diagnosis of DS are not larger than the typical population. If this child is choking it may be secondary to low muscle tone, the insertion of the tongue, or inability to coordinate suck, swallow and breath. Starting a muscle based program from birth will make a difference. Feel free to look at the resources on the TalkTools website, particularly the DS feeding class, at this point.***​

The mother also raised a question about her child's head shape and if it would change (there has been a referral for a helmet consult and a request for referral for PT that the PCP does not want to make until after the helmet consult). The PCP told the mother that it may or may not change and the PCP associated the child's head shape with the child's diagnosis of DS. How can I better educate this mother about this? I am beside myself. Is there not information that states otherwise?

​***I am not an expert in head shape...however some babies with DS do have some asymmetry or a flat back of the head. I have had a number of babies on my caseload that have successfully worn helmets.***​

Lisa

Lori Overland, MS, CCC-SLP, C/NDT

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Ask a Therapist: Physical Therapist Question on Oral Motor

Posted by Deborah Grauzam on

Hi,

 

I am a physical therapist working in Early Intervention in NJ. I have a 12 month child that I suspect has an undiagnosed syndrome. She has very low muscle throughout. Her cognitive level is about 6 months. She cannot sit unsupported. She can imitate a play action. She is making very few sounds. Frequently sticks out her tongue, open mouth posture. She can only eat pureed foods. I called for a speech assessment and was told by the Speech Therapist that there is no evidence that Oral Motor Therapy can help her speech at this age. Is that true?

Thank you for your help!

 

Tal

 

Dear Tal, 

Thank you for your question.  My name is Monica Purdy and I am a speech and language pathologist that also specializes in oral placement therapy and feeding. There is a lot of research on oral motor and the effectiveness and evidenced based information. If you visit this page on the TalkTools website you will find articles that you can print off and give to the speech therapist. Many speech therapists assume when someone mentions "oral motor" that they are referring to exercises such as "tongue wagging" (moving the tongue from side to side outside of the mouth), puffing the cheeks, and/or elevating the tongue to the nose or chin (again outside of the mouth). These activities do not have any support and are not related to speech or feeding and should not be used. However as you know being a physical therapist you can address muscle function by working on stability, dissociation, grading, precision and endurance in order to help a client with feeding and speech intelligibility. At TalkTools we do this by using kinesthetic feedback or tactile cues to help a client achieve these skills. Many times we work on feeding because it is a precursor to speech and we can prevent speech sound distortions from occurring if we address the muscles in feeding.   

I hope this helps, if you have any further questions please do not hesitate to contact me. 

Monica Purdy, M.A., CCC-SLP

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Ask A Therapist: The right duration of vibration

Posted by Deborah Grauzam on

Hello!

 

I have a question about using vibration (as with the Z-Vibe or Vibrator & Toothettes). I understand that using vibration can be used to "wake up" the sensory system, and I believe I’ve heard that it can have a temporarily positive effect on low muscle tone. I’ve read that vibration should be used in short durations, but I was wondering if you had any guidelines for the maximum or minimum duration of vibration? I’m thinking especially in a case of low muscle tone as in children with Down syndrome.

 

Thank you very much!

 

Jennifer

 

Hi Jennifer,

My name is Lori Overland and I teach the two day sensory-motor feeding class for TalkTools. Your email was forwarded to me, and it is an excellent question.

You cannot separate out the sensory and motor systems. Sensory feedback always impacts movement and movement provides feedback. It is important to make sure you have a specific motor goal (i.e.: in the case of spoon feeding, perhaps the goal is lip closure). Vibration facilitates a contraction of the muscle, so it may be used in conjunction with a tool to facilitate upper lip mobility for spoon feeding. If you leave vibration on a muscle for too long, the muscle relaxes. If you are using my pre-feeding exercises, I recommend  4-5 repetitions (maybe a little more or less depending on my client's sensory system) of an exercise. If you think about your motor goal and map sensory on to motor, you will not have to be concerned about using too much vibration. Feel free to email me if you have a follow up question.

Lori

 

Lori Overland, MS, CCC-SLP is a speech and language pathologist with more than 35 years of professional experience. Lori specializes in dealing with the unique needs of infants, toddlers, pre-schoolers and school-aged children with oral sensory-motor, feeding and oral placement/speech disorders. She has received an award from the Connecticut Down Syndrome Association for her work within this population. Lori consults with children from all over the world, providing evaluations, re-evaluations, program plans and week-long therapy programs. Lori also provides consults to local school districts and Birth-to-Three organizations. Her goal in addressing feeding and speech challenges is to improve the quality of life for both the children she serves and their families. In addition to her private practice, Alphabet Soup, Lori is a member of the TalkTools® speakers bureau. Lori has lectured on sensory-motor feeding disorders across the United States and internationally. Her classes, "Feeding Therapy: A Sensory-Motor Approach" and "Developing Oral-Motor Feeding Skills in the Down Syndrome Population" are approved for ASHA and AOTA CEUs. Lori is the co-author of A Sensory Motor Approach to Feeding. She holds degrees from Horfstra University and Adelphi University and has her neurodevelopmental certification.

Meet her!

- Oct. 14-15, 2016 for the workshop Feeding Therapy: A Sensory-Motor Approach in Cape Giraudoux, MO

- Oct. 29-30, 2016 for the workshop Feeding Therapy: A Sensory-Motor Approach in Minneapolis, MN

More dates at: TalkTools.com/Workshops

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Ask A Therapist: Introducing Therapy to a Child with Sensory Processing Disorder

Posted by Deborah Grauzam on

Hi,

 

I bought the Complete Jaw Program from you a few months ago to use with my three year old son who has Sensory Processing Disorder, and is in the Autism Spectrum. He has very low muscle tone in his mouth and does not chew at all. He eats a wide variety of foods but only in purees. He also drinks perfectly from a straw.

 

He drools constantly, mostly when he is doing an activity that requires his full attention.

 

He has great pronunciation of words, so for all the evaluations that he has had, the main problem in his mouth seems to be sensorial.

 

I have been struggling with the kit because he won't let me go into his mouth that easily and I'm afraid I might hurt him.

 

Do you have any course that I could take in order to learn how to use the kit?

 

Thank you for your comments.

 

Regards,

 

Amber

 

Hi Amber,

I am going to answer your question, as I teach a class on Oral Placement Therapy and Autism.

This is a typical problem in children with sensory processing issues, so the key is adding a desensitizing program prior to the Jaw Program. You can also use Applied Behavior Analysis strategies to condition the child to the therapy.

1.  Start the sessions with general body sensory tasks such as deep pressure, jumping on trampoline, etc. Ask your Occupational Therapist or your Physical Therapist for suggestions.

2. Engage in pre-feeding exercises from A Sensory Motor Approach To Feeding, Chapter 7, specifically massage, tapping and myofascial. The Jiggler and Z-Vibe tasks as well as the chewing hierarchy are also great.

3. Then introduce the tool. Do not place it in the mouth at first. Touch, accept to lips, accept to molars with no pressure, and then you can use vibration paired with the tool (Bite Blocks) to provoke a "bite and hold". The key is to be sure and provide direct , immediate reinforcers (often edibles) so the child pairs the tool with a positive.

For more information, please refer to the course Solving the Puzzle of Autism: Using Tactile Therapies.

Thanks,

Robyn Merkel-Walsh MA, CCC-SLP

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Ask A Therapist: Using Vibration for Low Muscle Tone

Posted by Deborah Grauzam on

Hi TalkTools,

 

I have a question about using vibration (as with the DnZ-Vibe or Vibrator & Toothettes). I understand that vibration can be used to "wake up" the sensory system, and I believe I’ve heard that it can have a temporarily positive effect on low muscle tone. I’ve read that vibration should be used in short durations, but I was wondering if you had any guidelines for the maximum or minimum duration of vibration? I’m thinking especially in a case of low muscle tone as in children with Down Syndrome.

 

Thank you very much!

 

Riley

 

Hi Riley,

I’m Renee, a TalkTools® Instructor, and I would be happy to help you. This is an excellent question, I am asked this many times when teaching and working with clients!

You are correct, vibration can give the muscle more input and therefore often trigger a better motor response, thus “waking up” or “stimulating” the muscle to move. There are no specific “time” or duration guidelines for this. It is our responsibility as the therapist to look at the motor response while providing the input. So for some children with significantly low tone and an extremely under-responsive sensory system, it may take longer for the muscle to respond. But for a child who may have a better sensory system, the client may only need quick input 1-2x to see the motor response. It is important to remember what specific motor movement you are looking for and that the stimulation given is causing the appropriate reaction.

For example if I am providing stimulation to the lateral margin of the tongue to facilitate tongue tip lateralization to the back molars, once I see the movement, the vibration has done its job. Then I need to decide if my goal is repetitive movement using the vibration - leading me to possibly provide the input several times until I no longer see the tongue tip follow the stimulus - or possibly to quickly transition that movement to function (i.e. placing a cube of food on the back molar so the client then uses the movement in a functional way) which is my highest priority but sometimes not yet obtainable in my first sessions with the client.

Once I am sure of the goal of the vibration stimulation (what am I looking for in the motor system) it is easier to determine how long I should use it! The goal is always to eventually eliminate the vibration so that the movement is then stimulated through functional activities such as eating and speaking.

I hope this helps!

Renee Roy Hill, MS, CCC-SLP

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