Tagged "Oral Motor Therapy"


Ask A Therapist: Challenging Patient

Posted by Deborah Grauzam on

Hi TalkTools!

 

I have taken your Three-Part Treatment Plan for Oral Placement Therapy class and have 3 of your books. I am using OPT within my practice and see positive results in my patients. I do have one patient who is very challenging. She is 16 years old, globally delayed and has a diagnosis of cerebral palsy, sensory processing disorder, low cognition and is nonverbal. She loves to eat and does eat a fairly typical diet despite all of this, but of course, can't chew very tough meats. She drools. She has had very little oral motor therapy integrated into her speech therapy treatment plan over the years.

 

I will call my patient, M. We have been working on the bite tube hierarchy following the OPT evaluation, and she is able to compress the bite tubes (red bite tube- 10, bilaterally which is an improvement from where she started;  yellow bite tube- 7 on left and 5 on right- both sides of jaw are weak, but right is weaker). We are about to add purple bite tube when parent is ready. It has also resulted in less mouthing of objects, oral seeking and general calming.

 

M. is hypersensitive to facial touch and having her hair touched. She is also over responsive to some kinds of touch within the mouth despite use of sensory techniques from OPT (sensory program with toothette) and Beckman techniques used for several months. She has shown an improvement to tolerate tooth brushing at home since intervention.

 

1 - M. is using straw #1 on the straw hierarchy, but since it has been systematically cut to 1/4 inch, she is showing an increased jaw movement, which I'm thinking means she is still suckling the straw rather than using a true suck. She is getting better at not placing her lips over built in lip block. She only uses the straw for part of the evening at home with parent supervision, it is not used during the school day, but I might be able to arrange this with school staff. Do you think the reason she is not progressing on straws is that I have cut the straw too short, too soon, or is she just not getting enough practice with it? She likely has been suckling for many years now.

 

2 - I have not had any success using the bubble blowing hierarchy or horn hierarchy or pre-hierarchy horn, even with having a PT present to assist with positioning. She does not appear to understand how to grade her abdominal movements to exhale at all.

 

3 - I would appreciate any guidance you can give me regarding M., as I do want to help her with saliva control. We have had some success increasing her ability to request preferred snacks and activities with the PECS program, since she came to me with no communication system at all. I am about to visit her school to collaborate on her treatment program. Her parents are willing to work on PECS with her at home. They would like for her drooling to decrease, but they are only able to work on straws and bite tubes to a limited degree at home.

 

Thank you for your time.

 

Holly

 

Hi Holly,

Thanks for your question! Allow me to address each of your questions individually to make things easy to follow.

1 - Go back to the 1/2" length to see if she is moving her jaw.  If not, then go to 3/8" as she is 16 years old and may need that amount of the straw to give her enough room to protrude her lips.  The length is not as important as her ability to use only her lips with her tongue retracted and not biting on the straw.  If she can do that without jaw movement, progress to Straw #2 cut to 3/8".

2 - Try working with an OT who can bounce her on a ball to generate airflow.  Once she can do that, you can put the horn in her mouth as she is bouncing down to teach the relationship.  I have also described another technique below that I use with some kids.

Whispered “Huh”

Place the open palm of M's hand 1” in front of your mouth as you say a whispered “huh” sound.  Immediately place M's​ open palm in front of M's​ mouth as you model the whispered “huh” sound.  Continue to alternate between your mouth and M's​ mouth until M tires, refuses the intervention or produces a volitional exhalation.  Reward any attempt at imitation. (Goal:  Associate the feel of airflow on M's​ hand with volitionally controlled oral airflow for speech sound production)

3 - ​It sounds as though you are on the right track with this young girl.  Keep at it as the techniques you are suggesting are the correct ones and you are making progress.  Let the parents know that the horn blowing will be the best treatment for the drooling but that you need them to do the homework at least 3 times a week or it will not work. I hope this answers your question but if not, please let me know how else I can help.

Sara Rosenfeld-Johnson, MS, CCC-SLP

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Ask A Therapist: Bite Tube Compression

Posted by Deborah Grauzam on

Hi to TalkTools, I am an SLP who has taken the Three-Part Treatment Plan for Oral Placement Therapy course and am incorporating OPT into my practice. I greatly enjoy this as it benefits my patients! Thank you!

 

I have a question regarding the bite tube hierarchy. I want to make sure I know if a patient is using a full compression. It seems that on the DVD, Sara says that we need to hear the "clicking" sound to know that the red tube is fully compressed. Is this true or is it merely a matter of seeing that the patient did bite down? Also, is this true for the yellow bite tube as I am able to make a "squeaking sound" when I bite down? What about the purple and green since they are harder and no sound is emitted?

 

Also, I have read the article Oral Habits: Why They Exist and How to Eliminate Them. I am aware that we can make the bite tubes available (they can have unlimited access and control over the bite tube themselves) to those who use an appropriate motor plan for chewing (up and down movement.....no gnawing, jaw sliding or jutting). I understand that this will satisfy the need for Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunction stimulation, but have concerns that they will want to spend an inordinate amount of time chewing on this ....that it will take on a "life of its own", so to speak. How do you recommend dealing with this concern? Give them complete access to the bite tube or not?

 

Thanks for your response.

 

Holly

 TalkTools Blog | Ask A Therapist: Bite Tubes

 

Dear Holly,

My name is Monica Purdy and I am one of the instructors for the Three-Part Treatment Plan for Oral Placement Therapy course. First let me say I am pleased you are enjoying using OPT. It has made such a difference in my practice as well!

Regarding your question about the bite tube hierarchy, we recommend that when you do an evaluation you use a new chew tube. Often when the chew tube is new, you will hear a clicking or a sound; however this may not always be the case. What you do want to see is a full compression and a full release of the chew tube. As for the purple and green, you are right and will not hear a sound, but again you should be seeing a full compression.

As for your question regarding oral habits, you are correct. If the child is able to motor plan and chew in an up and down controlled manner, and if I am not using the chew tube in the bite tube hierarchy, giving the chew tube to the child is a good option for them to replace their oral habit. Typically children will chew until they get the input they need from the chew tube. However, if you are using the chew tubes in the bite tube hierarchy, you will want to do the chew tubes with the child in a controlled manner when you see the child doing their oral habit. You may also think about putting them on the gum chewing hierarchy, as this is a great way for the child to get the input they need to the TMJ.

I hope I have answered your questions for you. If you have any concerns or questions please do not hesitate to let us know.

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Ask a Therapist: Proper Tongue Elevation & Retraction

Posted by Deborah Grauzam on

Dear Therapists

 

I need advice please! I am seeing a 5 year old child with severe childhood apraxia of speech together with dysarthria (specifically weakness of tongue and lips). So far his lip strength and movement has improved a lot, but I am really struggling with his tongue. He can protrude his tongue beautifully, retraction we are working on, but he is doing ok so far. Lateral movements we are also working on, but tongue elevation seems impossible!  Both posterior and anterior tongue movements just aren't happening! Any advice will be appreciated!!!

 

Kind Regards

 

Denise

 

Hi Denise,

Thank you for your email.  I understand your frustration!  I can tell you in looking at motor development, tongue tip elevation does not occur if you do not yet have retraction and stability along with lateral border stability which all allow the tongue tip to develop so it may just be a matter of continuing to work on the underlying skills necessary for tongue tip dissociation.  Often, children who have motor planning deficits in conjunction with oral motor weakness can progress at a rather slow pace and therapy can be difficult when compared to children who only have dysarthria.  I'm happy to help you sort out what might be missing!  I often find that the order I do treatment in can be as important as the exercise itself.  For example, many children with CAS and Dysarthria have difficulty isolating the motor skill I'm looking for, thus a good sensory-motor program may be useful immediately before targeting the motor task I have as a goal.

I'm not sure what education you have in TalkTools but the Three Part Treatment Plan teaches of our systematic approach to motor speech disorders based on normal development. I look forward to hearing from you!

Renee Roy Hill, MS, CCC-SLP

 

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Ask a Therapist: TMJ Sensory Feedback for Calming

Posted by Deborah Grauzam on

Hey Sara,

 

Recently you had a parent open question meeting in Corpus Christi, TX. I was there with my 8 month old baby. You were talking to a woman who's 5ish son with Down syndrome was repeatedly hitting his chin and you mentioned he was satisfying a feeling that was in his jaw by that action. I have noticed my baby has started doing that with her left hand. What do you recommend to help correct/redirect this behavior now?

 

-L

Hi L,

The sight of stability and calming for an infant is in the temporomandibular joint. This joint is where the upper and lower jaw meet right below the ear. There are more nerve endings going through that joint than any other location in the human body. When a baby sucks his/her thumb, sucks from a bottle, sucks on a pacifier, etc. the nerves in that joint are stimulated and the baby calms or even falls a sleep. If your child is doing other behaviors to stimulate the jaw like hitting the chin or for older children it may be teeth grinding, then it is probably time to introduce the Bite-Tube Hierarchy. You can learn more about this and other activities to increase jaw skills for both feeding and speech clarity in my book, "Assessment and Treatment of the Jaw: Putting it all together, Sensory Feeding and Speech."

If you do decide to purchase that book please read the chapter on Sensory first as it will explain to you in more detail the reason why babies and children with muscle-based deficits develop "habits" to compensate for the jaw weaknesses. I would also encourage you to share this information with your SLP as she may have additional suggestions.

I hope this has answered your question.

Sara Rosenfeld-Johnson, MS, CCC-SLP

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Ask a Therapist: Strong Gag Reflex

Posted by Deborah Grauzam on

Tervehdys!

 

I am speech pathologist from Finland, took your class about Feeding Therapy: a sensory-motor approach at Helsinki last May. I am sending you an e-mail, because I met a new client shortly after the class and this case really bothers me. I have asked permission from parents, to send this e-mail and pictures/short video when he's eating. So, this boy is 5 years old, he has had feeding issues since he was baby. Nowadays he eats almost anything but no meat. It seems like he doesn't have enough strength at his muscles to bite. When he eats, he puts lots of food into his mouth, only couple of bites and then he swallows. Looks like he's gagging when eating. He uses only couple of words, can't elevate his tongue without gagging. And when pronouncing for example sound /a/, he gags and tongue goes into "cup." He can't reach his upper alveoli with his tongue. The situation is horrible, I have only met him couple of times and it seems like the posterior tongue-tip would be one problem, maybe also tissue around it. I am writing a paper about him because he's going to see a doctor in September. But if it's possible, I would like to get another opinion - yours :-) Thank you so much, if you have time to answer me.

 

Yours,

 

Mrs. R

  IMG_0320 IMG_0343

Hello R,

You are absolutely correct. It looks like he has a type III posterior tongue tie. He probably cannot contract the lateral borders of his tongue. Chewing meat requires much more than just jaw strength, it requires being able to use the lateral borders of the tongue and cheeks together to stabilize the food. That is probably the problem when he is chewing meat. He cannot collect the bolus, and cannot stabilize the bolus on the molar ridge for mastication. He needs to be referred to an otolaryngologist (ENT) or an oral surgeon who understands the correlation between structure and function. Once his frenulum is released you may need to do the lingual exercises for function, BUT you will be able to facilitate the movements he needs for handling more difficult textures. GOOD OBSERVATION!!!!!!

Lori Overland, MS, CCC-SLP, C/NDT

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