Tagged "oral stimulation"


Ask A Therapist: Blue Chewy Tube

Posted by Deborah Grauzam on

Hi TalkTools,

 

I have a new patient who is 2 years and 7 months old. His tactile system is not organized at this time. He has bit chunks out of his crib. I recommended the blue Chewy Tube to help give him the prop he is seeking; however, his mom said he throws it. He enjoys biting the red Chewy Tube. Should I recommend she allows him to use the red to chew in spite of it being a therapy tool?

 

I look forward to your response. Thank you for having a question based email account. It is such a beneficial service.

 

Amy

 

Hi Amy,

I would not recommend him chewing on the red Chewy Tube on his own. What I would recommend is having the mom do his chewing exercises that you recommend multiple times a day when he is seeking that input (ex: he will chew on the red Chewy Tube 6 times on both sides). I know it is a huge commitment on her part but this will help strengthen his jaw while giving him the sensory input he is seeking. I would explore other chewing items that he might like and let him control those, but not the red. 

I hope this helps.

Let me know if you have other questions.

Thanks,

Liz

 

Elizabeth Smithson, MSP, CCC-SLP is a Speech-Language Pathologist who has over 10 years of professional experience working with infants, children, adolescents and adults. She earned her Master of Speech Pathology at the University of South Carolina. Liz is also a Level 5 TalkTools® Trained Therapist. She has received specialized training in Oral Placement Therapy, Speech, Feeding, Apraxia, Sensory Processing Disorders, and PROMPT©. Liz works with clients with a wide range of disabilities including Cerebral Palsy, Down Syndrome, and Spinal Muscular Atrophy.  She works through her own private practice Elizabeth Smithson Therapy, LLC in the home setting and in the TalkTools® office in Charleston, SC.

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Ask a Therapist: Sensory Feeding For An Infant With Medical Issue

Posted by Deborah Grauzam on

Dear Lori,

I attended the Sensory Feeding Course in England in June, and would like to thank you for a full two days of professional input.  Before I left Manchester, I had already thought of how I was going to utilize some of the techniques in my therapy sessions.

You had mentioned that you would not mind answering questions, so I hope you do not mind me taking advantage of the very generous offer.

I have my first appointment to see a 4 month old boy with feeding problems next week.  Mom reports that he breast fed nicely (after an initial period of latching difficulty, and the need to suck using a nipple shield). After 1 week, baby got floppy, stopped feeding, and was taken to hospital, where he stayed for a few weeks. He is currently being fed through a nasal feed tube.  Although he is reported to have a strong suck, he does not suck on breast for long. Bottle feeding has the same results.  This child has had extensive genetic testing, endoscopy (up to larynx), videofluroscopy, and EMG--all without any abnormal findings. He is scheduled for an endoscopy to investigate the esophagus.  He has reflux, and I was told that milk came through the nose.  The ENT did not find any sub-cutaneous cleft, nor velo-pharyngeal insufficiency.  He will also have an MRI.  The current medical opinion seems to indicate problems with swallowing.   All this information was received by phone. I have not seen any reports, as yet.

My goal for the session (aside from meeting and assessing the child), is to show mom the oral and sensory-motor stimulation techniques and massages (as well as hand, foot and body massages).  I also would like to introduce some pre-feeding activities, to try to prevent, or, at least minimize oral sensitivity and aversion to food taken orally.

Question: With a dry spoon (Beckman E-Z feeder), shall I introduce spoon feeding with a front feed, or side feed technique? I am inclined to do both, as they involve different oral motor movements.  However, I do not want to instill incorrect feeding behaviors.  (This is the first time that I am working with an infant).

I would like to thank you in advance for your input.

Best regards,

You are absolutely welcome to ask questions! I am so glad you have been able to use the techniques in your therapy.  I am wondering if this baby was tested for food allergies. Does he have reflux? What are his bowels like? Was he scoped? Do you know if they explored inflammation of the intestines or colon?  Does he have infantile spasms? There sounds like there is an underlying medical issue which has not been identified yet. I agree that your best course of action is to address his underlying oral sensory motor skills to support feeding. At 4 months of age and with so many unanswered medical questions I would not want to start spoon feeding just yet. 

When you do get ready to address spoon feeding if he has low tone, I would recommend side spoon feeding with either the small maroon spoon or the EZ spoon. Good luck with this little one!

Lori Overland, MS, CCC-SLP, C/NDT

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Ask a Therapist: Feeding Evaluation Questions

Posted by Deborah Grauzam on

We are just beginning our feeding clinic at a Medical Center for outpatient pediatrics. I have done one feeding evaluation since taking your class Feeding Therapy: A Sensory-Motor Approach, but now have a child on my caseload with an EXTENSIVE medical history, whom I am to evaluate. He has Tubuler/Tuberous sclerosis (tumors growing in his brain and other organs). He has seizures (is on seizure meds), severe Autism, nonverbal, hyperventilates, central sleep apnea, severe GERD, Bradycardia (when sleeping), desaturations (when tired or sick). He is seen by nearly every doctor imaginable. He had an MBS which showed aspiration with thin liquids, but was cleared for nectar liquids and pureed foods. He does not feed himself; he is held down by a weighted blanket because when awake, he severely injures himself by hitting his face. His adoptive mother indicates he was eating very well (not puree - he refused it, but would eat mechanical soft - whole without chewing) until January when his PO intake severely decreased to where he will only eat 1/2 of a meal. He had a PEG tube, which is now a Mickey tube, and gets G-tube feeds following meals to cover the calories he didn't get by PO means. He needs 1980 calories a day due to his constant effortful breathing. The family's goals for him are to increase PO and be able to chew foods. I did a very brief oral motor stim with him, and he tolerated facial massage and accepted a toothette to his cheeks and tongue. I'm not even sure of what questions to ask, but am thankful for any insight you may be able to provide. Thank you in advance! 

This sounds like a complicated child for your second feeding evaluation! So...the most important thing to remember is ..no extraneous "oral stimulation.” It is important to make sure you are mapping sensory input on to motor goals to support nutritive feeding. As you presented the toothette under his top lip, did you get upper lip mobility? Did he contract his cheek when you did the cheek stretch? Did you observe lateral tongue movement? In your assessment, look at the motor skills he needs to support safe nutritive feeding of texture modified solids and use your pre-feeding exercises to facilitate them. If he doesn't respond to the input you use...you may have to increase the sensory input (i.e.: dip the toothette in ice chips, cautiously experiment with vibration...etc). He sounds like a child who needs intense sensory input (i.e.: the weighted blanket, self abusive behaviors). Has he had a good sensory processing evaluation? If not, this is really important...a good sensory diet may help decrease the self injurious behaviors. I also want you to make sure you look at posture and alignment for both your pre-feeding and feeding programs. As you make observations, feel free to email me.

Good luck!

Lori Overland

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