Tagged "red chewy tube"


Ask A Therapist: Chewy Tubes for a one-year-old

Posted by Deborah Grauzam on

Hi!

 

I am working with a little boy who is about a year old, developmentally (orally) is around 8-9 months. I gave the family the yellow chewy tube to practice biting/chewing, in addition to desensitizing gag reflex--instructing them to use with close adult supervision. The caregiver reports to me that his pediatrician told her not to give him the chewy tube as it is "too advanced for him". My question: is there a particular age range for these chewy tubes? Is there any information I can provide this doctor to support the use of chewy tubes in the treatment of feeding for speech therapy?

 

Thank you so much!

 

Sarah

 

Hi Sarah,

I am sorry the child's pediatrician is not as accepting of the chewy tubes.  I have used the chewy tubes with much younger children so I am not sure why the pediatrician is opposed to it.  It might be worth calling and discussing with him.  Maybe giving him the website, blog link, and more information about it would be helpful.  

The only other chewy tube that you could try that would be easier is the red chewy tube.

Please let me know if you have anything else come up or have any other questions. We are always happy to help.

Thanks,

Liz

Elizabeth Smithson, MSP, CCC-SLP is a Speech-Language Pathologist who has over 10 years of professional experience working with infants, children, adolescents and adults. She earned her Master of Speech Pathology at the University of South Carolina. Liz is also a Level 5 TalkTools® Trained Therapist. She has received specialized training in Oral Placement Therapy, Speech, Feeding, Apraxia, Sensory Processing Disorders, and PROMPT©. Liz works with clients with a wide range of disabilities including Cerebral Palsy, Down Syndrome, and Spinal Muscular Atrophy. She works through her own private practice Elizabeth Smithson Therapy, LLC in the home setting and in the TalkTools® office in Charleston, SC.

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Ask A Therapist: A client bites down on baby bottle

Posted by Deborah Grauzam on

Hello! 

 

My name is Yael and I have a patient who is 18 months, has low tone in the oral area, likes a lot of sensory input inside the mouth but won't suck on a straw or drink from a cup. He only drinks from a baby bottle and kind of bites down on it. How can I start working on his suckling skills so I can work with the straws and all the other tools?

 

Thank you!

 

Yael

 

Hi Yael,

I will give you a number of things to try and see what works for your patient.  I would work on providing a good sensory warm up with the Vibrator & Toothette, chewing on gloved finger, using the z-vibe, or red Chewy Tube (depends on where your client is with jaw strength). I would question if your patient has jaw weakness based on your description.  You can also try rocking the bottle in and out of the mouth to encourage more of a front/ back pattern versus the up/ down biting. Then I would try to use the Honey Bear with Flexible Straw to encourage drinking.  You will load the straw for the patient and provide jaw and cheeks support if needed. I hope some of this helps.

Please let me know if you have any other questions. We are happy to help.

Thanks,

Liz

 

Elizabeth Smithson, MSP, CCC-SLP is a Speech-Language Pathologist who has over 10 years of professional experience working with infants, children, adolescents and adults. She earned her Master of Speech Pathology at the University of South Carolina. Liz is also a Level 5 TalkTools® Trained Therapist. She has received specialized training in Oral Placement Therapy, Speech, Feeding, Apraxia, Sensory Processing Disorders, and PROMPT©. Liz works with clients with a wide range of disabilities including Cerebral Palsy, Down Syndrome, and Spinal Muscular Atrophy. She works through her own private practice Elizabeth Smithson Therapy, LLC in the home setting and in the TalkTools® office in Charleston, SC.

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Ask A Therapist: Blue Chewy Tube

Posted by Deborah Grauzam on

Hi TalkTools,

 

I have a new patient who is 2 years and 7 months old. His tactile system is not organized at this time. He has bit chunks out of his crib. I recommended the blue Chewy Tube to help give him the prop he is seeking; however, his mom said he throws it. He enjoys biting the red Chewy Tube. Should I recommend she allows him to use the red to chew in spite of it being a therapy tool?

 

I look forward to your response. Thank you for having a question based email account. It is such a beneficial service.

 

Amy

 

Hi Amy,

I would not recommend him chewing on the red Chewy Tube on his own. What I would recommend is having the mom do his chewing exercises that you recommend multiple times a day when he is seeking that input (ex: he will chew on the red Chewy Tube 6 times on both sides). I know it is a huge commitment on her part but this will help strengthen his jaw while giving him the sensory input he is seeking. I would explore other chewing items that he might like and let him control those, but not the red. 

I hope this helps.

Let me know if you have other questions.

Thanks,

Liz

 

Elizabeth Smithson, MSP, CCC-SLP is a Speech-Language Pathologist who has over 10 years of professional experience working with infants, children, adolescents and adults. She earned her Master of Speech Pathology at the University of South Carolina. Liz is also a Level 5 TalkTools® Trained Therapist. She has received specialized training in Oral Placement Therapy, Speech, Feeding, Apraxia, Sensory Processing Disorders, and PROMPT©. Liz works with clients with a wide range of disabilities including Cerebral Palsy, Down Syndrome, and Spinal Muscular Atrophy.  She works through her own private practice Elizabeth Smithson Therapy, LLC in the home setting and in the TalkTools® office in Charleston, SC.

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Ask A Therapist: Open Mouth Posture

Posted by Deborah Grauzam on

Hi TalkTools,

 

I have purchased the Jaw Grading Bite Blocks to assist a client I have who has an open mouth posture most of the time and some significant difficulty with articulation and moderate amounts of drooling. Unfortunately I think I was premature in attempting the Bite Blocks assessment. I read through the book Oral Placement Therapy for Speech Clarity and Feeding thoroughly before beginning. He had a lot of difficulty attending to the specific directions I was giving. In addition, when he did bite down on the #2 block at the very beginning of the assessment, his jaw kept moving laterally. He doesn’t have a “natural bite”.

 

Could someone please advise me as to how I should proceed with this client?  I’m new to the TalkTools world and would appreciate an idea on where to start with this client.

 

Karen

 

Hi Karen,

I would advise that you work on the Bite Tube Set starting with the Red Bite Tube. This will work on your client's jaw strength and as you work through the bite tubes you can revisit the bite blocks. You would look to see if he is later able to achieve the "natural bite" and "bite hold" required with the bite blocks. Please let me know if you have any other questions.

Thanks,

Liz

 

Elizabeth Smithson, MSP, CCC-SLP is a Speech-Language Pathologist who has over 10 years of professional experience working with infants, children, adolescents and adults. She earned her Master of Speech Pathology at the University of South Carolina. Liz is also a Level 5 TalkTools® Trained Therapist. She has received specialized training in Oral Placement Therapy, Speech, Feeding, Apraxia, Sensory Processing Disorders, and PROMPT©. Liz works with clients with a wide range of disabilities including Cerebral Palsy, Down Syndrome, and Spinal Muscular Atrophy.  She works through her own private practice Elizabeth Smithson Therapy, LLC in the home setting and in the TalkTools® office in Charleston, SC.

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Ask a Therapist: Unsupervised Chewing

Posted by Deborah Grauzam on

Hello, My patient was evaluated by you in June of 2014.  We are currently using the red chewy tube and yellow chewy tube in therapy and at home to improve jaw strength and stability. However, the patient is now seeking ‘input’ orally- especially with chewing, now more than ever before.  How can we support this sensory need without promoting undesirable skills like jaw sliding?  Is there something else she can chew on- unsupervised? Thank you!

The situation you describe is one I see with many of my clients.  Once the clients "feel" jaw mobility using the "Bite Tube Hierarchy" and are thereby receiving the needed temporo-mandibular joint stimulation for calming they often increase their need or desire to mobilize the jaw (seeking oral input).  The Bite Tube Hierarchy will eventually incorporate four tubes as described in the book, "Oral Placement Therapy for Speech Clarity and Feeding."  The goal of the tools is to give the needed stimulation to increase jaw stability so that the client will then transition that skill into feeding and speech thereby eliminating the need for the tool and the need to chew on non-food items.  For this reason I do ask therapists to not give these tubes to the kids as then they may use them with an inappropriate jaw slide or jut.

With that said, however, you do ask an important question, " Is there something else she can chew on - unsupervised?"  Since I do not know the name of your client I cannot refer to the Program Plan I wrote for her/him I can only list for you the additional options: Slow Feed for snacks, Gum Chewing (without swallowing the gum) and Jaw Grading Bite Blocks. Each of these therapy techniques is taught in that same book, "Oral Placement Therapy for Speech Clarity and Feeding."  In addition, they are taught in the class, "A Three part Treatment Plan for Oral Placement Therapy" which will give you the gestalt of why and how to work on muscle-based speech clarity deficits.

Our goal for anyone with jaw weakness and instability is to increase the skill so that the jaw can support the independent movement of the lips and tongue for speech clarity and feeding safety so that is why I am focusing on the therapy suggestions above.

However, I still have not answered your question.  There are many sensory tools sold by TalkTools and other companies that allow the child to hold the tool without supervision as they are not working on jaw grading but are instead focusing on sensory feedback.  They include the Star Vibrator, Chewy Tubes, and ARK products.  As long as you are not using the tools used in the "Bite Tube Hierarchy" your client can hold and chew on any of the other options.

Sara Rosenfeld-Johnson, MS, CCC-SLP

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