Tagged "sensory processing"


Ask A Therapist: 4 year old with Sensory Processing Disorder

Posted by Deborah Grauzam on

Hi TalkTools,

 

I am working with a 4 year old boy with Sensory Processing Disorder. When producing the /s/ phoneme he takes a quick inhalation of air. He is able to produce /z/ and /sh/ with appropriate outward flow of air. We have worked on discriminating correct vs. in correct airflow, horn blowing, air hockey with cotton ball or whiffle ball, and cheerio for tongue tip placement with adding the airflow as well. Despite max attempts he is unable to produce the sound in isolation. Any tips or advice you could provide would be greatly appreciated!

 

Thank you!!!

 

Randee

 

Hi Randee,

I would work on voice versus voiceless sounds. Having him feel your throat to see that with the "z" you are using your voice box and call "s" your quiet sound and work on the difference that way.  Another thing that I have tried to help with placement is a straw placed on the tongue down the middle out of the front of the mouth.  This helps kids to feel where the air needs to go. But it sounds like he has the placement piece since he is able to say the "z". Just something extra to try. There is also a complete list of oral placement activities to work on "s" and "z" on page 18 in Sara Rosenfeld-Johnson's book: Oral Placement Therapy for Speech Clarity and Feeding. This will give you a list of other activities to try. Let us know if we can do anything else to help.

Thanks,

Liz

 

Elizabeth Smithson, MSP, CCC-SLP is a Speech-Language Pathologist who has over 10 years of professional experience working with infants, children, adolescents and adults. She earned her Master of Speech Pathology at the University of South Carolina. Liz is also a Level 5 TalkTools® Trained Therapist. She has received specialized training in Oral Placement Therapy, Speech, Feeding, Apraxia, Sensory Processing Disorders, and PROMPT©. Liz works with clients with a wide range of disabilities including Cerebral Palsy, Down Syndrome, and Spinal Muscular Atrophy.  She works through her own private practice Elizabeth Smithson Therapy, LLC in the home setting and in the TalkTools® office in Charleston, SC.

Read more →

Ask A Therapist: Introducing Therapy to a Child with Sensory Processing Disorder

Posted by Deborah Grauzam on

Hi,

 

I bought the Complete Jaw Program from you a few months ago to use with my three year old son who has Sensory Processing Disorder, and is in the Autism Spectrum. He has very low muscle tone in his mouth and does not chew at all. He eats a wide variety of foods but only in purees. He also drinks perfectly from a straw.

 

He drools constantly, mostly when he is doing an activity that requires his full attention.

 

He has great pronunciation of words, so for all the evaluations that he has had, the main problem in his mouth seems to be sensorial.

 

I have been struggling with the kit because he won't let me go into his mouth that easily and I'm afraid I might hurt him.

 

Do you have any course that I could take in order to learn how to use the kit?

 

Thank you for your comments.

 

Regards,

 

Amber

 

Hi Amber,

I am going to answer your question, as I teach a class on Oral Placement Therapy and Autism.

This is a typical problem in children with sensory processing issues, so the key is adding a desensitizing program prior to the Jaw Program. You can also use Applied Behavior Analysis strategies to condition the child to the therapy.

1.  Start the sessions with general body sensory tasks such as deep pressure, jumping on trampoline, etc. Ask your Occupational Therapist or your Physical Therapist for suggestions.

2. Engage in pre-feeding exercises from A Sensory Motor Approach To Feeding, Chapter 7, specifically massage, tapping and myofascial. The Jiggler and Z-Vibe tasks as well as the chewing hierarchy are also great.

3. Then introduce the tool. Do not place it in the mouth at first. Touch, accept to lips, accept to molars with no pressure, and then you can use vibration paired with the tool (Bite Blocks) to provoke a "bite and hold". The key is to be sure and provide direct , immediate reinforcers (often edibles) so the child pairs the tool with a positive.

For more information, please refer to the course Solving the Puzzle of Autism: Using Tactile Therapies.

Thanks,

Robyn Merkel-Walsh MA, CCC-SLP

Read more →

Ask A Therapist: Jaw Grading Bite Blocks and Dissociation

Posted by Deborah Grauzam on

Hello TalkTools,

 

I am Speech and Language Therapist working with an 11 year old with autism. He has a TalkTools® Program Plan, but I would value the opinion/support of one of your Instructors.

 

A significant priority at present is supporting him with dissociation of his jaw movements and then with grading. However, we have not been able to get a reliable bite on the Jaw Grading Bite Blocks. Interestingly, after about a month, he has achieved a bite/hold on the DnZ-vibe (not what I had initially planned that we would work on) with the vibration turned on. When the vibration is turned off, his bite is not so reliable. We are working at present on transferring the bite/hold to the #5 Jaw Grading Bite Block.

 

Do your instructors have any thoughts or experience with this? He does have complex sensory needs that are clearly factors in his eating, speech and other motor skills. I will certainly seek out advice from his Occupational Therapist once he has settled into a new school placement soon.

 

Many thanks,

 

Sally

 

Hi Sally,

I'm Robyn, a TalkTools® Instructor, and I've received your inquiry.

You are actually answering your own question, so great observation! This client needs more input to understand what's expected.

Hold the Bite Block in your right hand. With your left hand, hold a Jiggler in place on the top of the Bite Block and place at the correct spot as directed. I usually grab both tools with one hand and apply upward pressure on the mandible and say " bite and hold".

If this doesn't work, try reversing the hierarchy and working from 7 to 2 on the Bite Blocks, because the weakness may be in the high position. If there is a low jaw posture, sometimes reversing the order of the hierarchy is required.

I hope this helps!

Sincerely,

Robyn Merkel-Walsh, MA, CCC-SLP

Read more →

Ask a Therapist: Sensory Processing assistance with a client that has Down syndrome

Posted by Deborah Grauzam on

Hi Lori,
 
I am a speech pathologist working with Toddlers. A few years ago I attended your conference on feeding therapy. I haven’t had to use a lot of the techniques up until now, so I am a little rusty.  I currently have a little guy with Down syndrome who is not chewing a great deal. His mom told me that at home she is noticing a great deal of gagging and sometimes vomiting because of this. We have been trying different textures; however, nothing seems to be working. He is also pretty resistant to chewy tubes and allows them in his mouth for only a short time. He either lets go or will bite down and not let go. I have been looking at the chewing hierarchy, but tools are listed (e.g., z-vibe, etc.) that I can’t remember exactly what I am supposed to do with. Do you have any suggestions on how to target this or where to start? Thank you so much for your help. I appreciate it!
 

Hello and thank you for the questions.

As often occurs, I have a bunch of questions to start.

Does this little one have other sensory issues?  Is there an OT who specializes in sensory processing involved?  Have you made observations about what this little one is doing with his lips, cheeks and tongue (for purees, and for solids).

I would assume (based on the diagnosis) that you should probably be working on cheek mobility and bilabial closure for spoon, cup etc.  If a protrusion/retraction is the primary tongue movement, work on tongue lateralization.  Does the child tolerate vibration?  If so, use the vibe fine tip for the lateral tongue massage.  Try the vibe bite and chew XL head (looks like a yellow chewy tube) if he will not tolerate chewy tubes.  You may want to go outside the box and roll the tool from the lateral incisor to the first molar if this child does not like the tool on the molar ridge. By the way, I have just written a book which should be out in June if you need a review of the class (and updated exercises!!!!).

Best,

Lori Overland

Read more →
script type="text/javascript" src="//downloads.mailchimp.com/js/signup-forms/popup/unique-methods/embed.js" data-dojo-config="usePlainJson: true, isDebug: false">