Tagged "sensory system"


Ask A Therapist: Blue Chewy Tube

Posted by Deborah Grauzam on

Hi TalkTools,

 

I have a new patient who is 2 years and 7 months old. His tactile system is not organized at this time. He has bit chunks out of his crib. I recommended the blue Chewy Tube to help give him the prop he is seeking; however, his mom said he throws it. He enjoys biting the red Chewy Tube. Should I recommend she allows him to use the red to chew in spite of it being a therapy tool?

 

I look forward to your response. Thank you for having a question based email account. It is such a beneficial service.

 

Amy

 

Hi Amy,

I would not recommend him chewing on the red Chewy Tube on his own. What I would recommend is having the mom do his chewing exercises that you recommend multiple times a day when he is seeking that input (ex: he will chew on the red Chewy Tube 6 times on both sides). I know it is a huge commitment on her part but this will help strengthen his jaw while giving him the sensory input he is seeking. I would explore other chewing items that he might like and let him control those, but not the red. 

I hope this helps.

Let me know if you have other questions.

Thanks,

Liz

 

Elizabeth Smithson, MSP, CCC-SLP is a Speech-Language Pathologist who has over 10 years of professional experience working with infants, children, adolescents and adults. She earned her Master of Speech Pathology at the University of South Carolina. Liz is also a Level 5 TalkTools® Trained Therapist. She has received specialized training in Oral Placement Therapy, Speech, Feeding, Apraxia, Sensory Processing Disorders, and PROMPT©. Liz works with clients with a wide range of disabilities including Cerebral Palsy, Down Syndrome, and Spinal Muscular Atrophy.  She works through her own private practice Elizabeth Smithson Therapy, LLC in the home setting and in the TalkTools® office in Charleston, SC.

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Ask A Therapist: The right duration of vibration

Posted by Deborah Grauzam on

Hello!

 

I have a question about using vibration (as with the Z-Vibe or Vibrator & Toothettes). I understand that using vibration can be used to "wake up" the sensory system, and I believe I’ve heard that it can have a temporarily positive effect on low muscle tone. I’ve read that vibration should be used in short durations, but I was wondering if you had any guidelines for the maximum or minimum duration of vibration? I’m thinking especially in a case of low muscle tone as in children with Down syndrome.

 

Thank you very much!

 

Jennifer

 

Hi Jennifer,

My name is Lori Overland and I teach the two day sensory-motor feeding class for TalkTools. Your email was forwarded to me, and it is an excellent question.

You cannot separate out the sensory and motor systems. Sensory feedback always impacts movement and movement provides feedback. It is important to make sure you have a specific motor goal (i.e.: in the case of spoon feeding, perhaps the goal is lip closure). Vibration facilitates a contraction of the muscle, so it may be used in conjunction with a tool to facilitate upper lip mobility for spoon feeding. If you leave vibration on a muscle for too long, the muscle relaxes. If you are using my pre-feeding exercises, I recommend  4-5 repetitions (maybe a little more or less depending on my client's sensory system) of an exercise. If you think about your motor goal and map sensory on to motor, you will not have to be concerned about using too much vibration. Feel free to email me if you have a follow up question.

Lori

 

Lori Overland, MS, CCC-SLP is a speech and language pathologist with more than 35 years of professional experience. Lori specializes in dealing with the unique needs of infants, toddlers, pre-schoolers and school-aged children with oral sensory-motor, feeding and oral placement/speech disorders. She has received an award from the Connecticut Down Syndrome Association for her work within this population. Lori consults with children from all over the world, providing evaluations, re-evaluations, program plans and week-long therapy programs. Lori also provides consults to local school districts and Birth-to-Three organizations. Her goal in addressing feeding and speech challenges is to improve the quality of life for both the children she serves and their families. In addition to her private practice, Alphabet Soup, Lori is a member of the TalkTools® speakers bureau. Lori has lectured on sensory-motor feeding disorders across the United States and internationally. Her classes, "Feeding Therapy: A Sensory-Motor Approach" and "Developing Oral-Motor Feeding Skills in the Down Syndrome Population" are approved for ASHA and AOTA CEUs. Lori is the co-author of A Sensory Motor Approach to Feeding. She holds degrees from Horfstra University and Adelphi University and has her neurodevelopmental certification.

Meet her!

- Oct. 14-15, 2016 for the workshop Feeding Therapy: A Sensory-Motor Approach in Cape Giraudoux, MO

- Oct. 29-30, 2016 for the workshop Feeding Therapy: A Sensory-Motor Approach in Minneapolis, MN

More dates at: TalkTools.com/Workshops

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Ask A Therapist: Using Vibration for Low Muscle Tone

Posted by Deborah Grauzam on

Hi TalkTools,

 

I have a question about using vibration (as with the DnZ-Vibe or Vibrator & Toothettes). I understand that vibration can be used to "wake up" the sensory system, and I believe I’ve heard that it can have a temporarily positive effect on low muscle tone. I’ve read that vibration should be used in short durations, but I was wondering if you had any guidelines for the maximum or minimum duration of vibration? I’m thinking especially in a case of low muscle tone as in children with Down Syndrome.

 

Thank you very much!

 

Riley

 

Hi Riley,

I’m Renee, a TalkTools® Instructor, and I would be happy to help you. This is an excellent question, I am asked this many times when teaching and working with clients!

You are correct, vibration can give the muscle more input and therefore often trigger a better motor response, thus “waking up” or “stimulating” the muscle to move. There are no specific “time” or duration guidelines for this. It is our responsibility as the therapist to look at the motor response while providing the input. So for some children with significantly low tone and an extremely under-responsive sensory system, it may take longer for the muscle to respond. But for a child who may have a better sensory system, the client may only need quick input 1-2x to see the motor response. It is important to remember what specific motor movement you are looking for and that the stimulation given is causing the appropriate reaction.

For example if I am providing stimulation to the lateral margin of the tongue to facilitate tongue tip lateralization to the back molars, once I see the movement, the vibration has done its job. Then I need to decide if my goal is repetitive movement using the vibration - leading me to possibly provide the input several times until I no longer see the tongue tip follow the stimulus - or possibly to quickly transition that movement to function (i.e. placing a cube of food on the back molar so the client then uses the movement in a functional way) which is my highest priority but sometimes not yet obtainable in my first sessions with the client.

Once I am sure of the goal of the vibration stimulation (what am I looking for in the motor system) it is easier to determine how long I should use it! The goal is always to eventually eliminate the vibration so that the movement is then stimulated through functional activities such as eating and speaking.

I hope this helps!

Renee Roy Hill, MS, CCC-SLP

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