Tagged "Speech Therapy"


Ask A Therapist: /h/ for /k/

Posted by Deborah Grauzam on

Hi TalkTools,

 

I have a 6 year old male student who produces /h/ for /k/. He appears to have placement, and is able to produce /g/. However, we have not been successful in nearly a year of therapy with eliciting /k/. His voice is hoarse during conversational speech. His mother is not interested in visiting an Ear, Nose & Throat Doctor. Do you have any suggestions or theories? Thank you.

 

Angela

 

Hi Angela,

Based on what you have written he just is not associating tongue elevation with his "k" sound and instead is producing the 'h." I would work on "g" repetitively and throw in a whispered "k" in a sequence of sounds (having him repeat). I would try to get him in the right position over and over and over again and then switch quickly to the "k" and see if that works. Work on teaching "k" as the quiet sound. 

Other exercises you can try would be horn blowing, bubble blowing, and straw drinking. This will help to reinforce the back of tongue retraction that is important for that speech sound. Even though it seems he already has the placement with the "g," hopefully the repetition will help get him transitioned to the "k."

I hope these ideas help. Please let me know how it goes and write back with any other questions.

Have a great day.

Thanks,

Liz

 

Elizabeth Smithson, MSP, CCC-SLP is a Speech-Language Pathologist who has over 10 years of professional experience working with infants, children, adolescents and adults. She earned her Master of Speech Pathology at the University of South Carolina. Liz is also a Level 5 TalkTools® Trained Therapist. She has received specialized training in Oral Placement Therapy, Speech, Feeding, Apraxia, Sensory Processing Disorders, and PROMPT©. Liz works with clients with a wide range of disabilities including Cerebral Palsy, Down Syndrome, and Spinal Muscular Atrophy.  She works through her own private practice Elizabeth Smithson Therapy, LLC in the home setting and in the TalkTools® office in Charleston, SC.

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Ask A Therapist: Sound production roadblock

Posted by Deborah Grauzam on

Hello therapists,

 

My daughter has been working on TalkTools program since she was 3 months old. She bites well on chewy tubes (red and yellow), does her straw drinking and cup drinking. Here are my few questions:

 

1) My daughter seems to be drinking well from cup and does horn exercise well, but we have a hard time translating the horn exercise to "m" sound. Do you have any advice to encourage the "m" sound?

 

2) We feel like we are reaching a roadblock with her exercise because we cannot get her to make sounds that we want, i.e.: "mmm," "me," "moo," etc. She would round her lip but has a hard time saying "wooo" or "oooo". Is there any exercise we should work on to help with making those sounds?

 

Thanks a lot, we love your program a lot and hope to hear from you!

 

Jessie

 

Hi Jessie,

Thank you for your questions. I would try the Apraxia Shapes. They are great. They will help you with exactly what you were describing in both your questions. I believe that they will be able to bridge the gap for you. There is a video that you can watch to show you exactly how to use them and instructions that come with the tools.

Please let me know if you have any other questions. I am happy to help anyway I can.

Have a great day.

Thanks,

Liz

 

Elizabeth Smithson, MSP, CCC-SLP is a Speech-Language Pathologist who has over 10 years of professional experience working with infants, children, adolescents and adults. She earned her Master of Speech Pathology at the University of South Carolina. Liz is also a Level 5 TalkTools® Trained Therapist. She has received specialized training in Oral Placement Therapy, Speech, Feeding, Apraxia, Sensory Processing Disorders, and PROMPT©. Liz works with clients with a wide range of disabilities including Cerebral Palsy, Down Syndrome, and Spinal Muscular Atrophy.  She works through her own private practice Elizabeth Smithson Therapy, LLC in the home setting and in the TalkTools® office in Charleston, SC.

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Ask A Therapist: Open Mouth Posture

Posted by Deborah Grauzam on

Hi TalkTools,

 

I have purchased the Jaw Grading Bite Blocks to assist a client I have who has an open mouth posture most of the time and some significant difficulty with articulation and moderate amounts of drooling. Unfortunately I think I was premature in attempting the Bite Blocks assessment. I read through the book Oral Placement Therapy for Speech Clarity and Feeding thoroughly before beginning. He had a lot of difficulty attending to the specific directions I was giving. In addition, when he did bite down on the #2 block at the very beginning of the assessment, his jaw kept moving laterally. He doesn’t have a “natural bite”.

 

Could someone please advise me as to how I should proceed with this client?  I’m new to the TalkTools world and would appreciate an idea on where to start with this client.

 

Karen

 

Hi Karen,

I would advise that you work on the Bite Tube Set starting with the Red Bite Tube. This will work on your client's jaw strength and as you work through the bite tubes you can revisit the bite blocks. You would look to see if he is later able to achieve the "natural bite" and "bite hold" required with the bite blocks. Please let me know if you have any other questions.

Thanks,

Liz

 

Elizabeth Smithson, MSP, CCC-SLP is a Speech-Language Pathologist who has over 10 years of professional experience working with infants, children, adolescents and adults. She earned her Master of Speech Pathology at the University of South Carolina. Liz is also a Level 5 TalkTools® Trained Therapist. She has received specialized training in Oral Placement Therapy, Speech, Feeding, Apraxia, Sensory Processing Disorders, and PROMPT©. Liz works with clients with a wide range of disabilities including Cerebral Palsy, Down Syndrome, and Spinal Muscular Atrophy.  She works through her own private practice Elizabeth Smithson Therapy, LLC in the home setting and in the TalkTools® office in Charleston, SC.

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Ask A Therapist: Child with a small mouth

Posted by Deborah Grauzam on

Hi TalkTools,

I am working with a child with a very small mouth, and the Yellow Chewy Tube is still too big and too hard for him. What would you recommend I use with him instead until he can use that? Thanks.

Jennifer

 

Hi Jennifer,

I received your question regarding your patient with the very small mouth. There are two things that I would try. You could do the gum chewing exercise that is explained in detail in Sara Rosenfeld-Johnson's book Assessment and Treatment of the Jaw, page 115.  I would just use a small enough piece of gum to fit in your client's mouth.  I would also try to work on the Sensory Friendly Bite Blocks (Purple) and gradually work up from the smallest and see if this would eventually increase the oral range of motion for your client. I would then revisit the chewy tube and see if he is able after working on the other exercises.  I hope these ideas help.  Please let us know if you have any other questions.

Thanks,

Liz

 

Elizabeth Smithson, MSP, CCC-SLP is a Speech-Language Pathologist who has over 10 years of professional experience working with infants, children, adolescents and adults. She earned her Master of Speech Pathology at the University of South Carolina. Liz is also a Level 5 TalkTools® Trained Therapist. She has received specialized training in Oral Placement Therapy, Speech, Feeding, Apraxia, Sensory Processing Disorders, and PROMPT©. Liz works with clients with a wide range of disabilities including Cerebral Palsy, Down Syndrome, and Spinal Muscular Atrophy.  She works through her own private practice Elizabeth Smithson Therapy, LLC in the home setting and in the TalkTools® office in Charleston, SC.

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Ask A Therapist: 4 year old with Sensory Processing Disorder

Posted by Deborah Grauzam on

Hi TalkTools,

 

I am working with a 4 year old boy with Sensory Processing Disorder. When producing the /s/ phoneme he takes a quick inhalation of air. He is able to produce /z/ and /sh/ with appropriate outward flow of air. We have worked on discriminating correct vs. in correct airflow, horn blowing, air hockey with cotton ball or whiffle ball, and cheerio for tongue tip placement with adding the airflow as well. Despite max attempts he is unable to produce the sound in isolation. Any tips or advice you could provide would be greatly appreciated!

 

Thank you!!!

 

Randee

 

Hi Randee,

I would work on voice versus voiceless sounds. Having him feel your throat to see that with the "z" you are using your voice box and call "s" your quiet sound and work on the difference that way.  Another thing that I have tried to help with placement is a straw placed on the tongue down the middle out of the front of the mouth.  This helps kids to feel where the air needs to go. But it sounds like he has the placement piece since he is able to say the "z". Just something extra to try. There is also a complete list of oral placement activities to work on "s" and "z" on page 18 in Sara Rosenfeld-Johnson's book: Oral Placement Therapy for Speech Clarity and Feeding. This will give you a list of other activities to try. Let us know if we can do anything else to help.

Thanks,

Liz

 

Elizabeth Smithson, MSP, CCC-SLP is a Speech-Language Pathologist who has over 10 years of professional experience working with infants, children, adolescents and adults. She earned her Master of Speech Pathology at the University of South Carolina. Liz is also a Level 5 TalkTools® Trained Therapist. She has received specialized training in Oral Placement Therapy, Speech, Feeding, Apraxia, Sensory Processing Disorders, and PROMPT©. Liz works with clients with a wide range of disabilities including Cerebral Palsy, Down Syndrome, and Spinal Muscular Atrophy.  She works through her own private practice Elizabeth Smithson Therapy, LLC in the home setting and in the TalkTools® office in Charleston, SC.

Read more →
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