Tagged "Z-vibe"


Ask a Therapist: Significant Tongue Thrust Swallow Pattern and Tongue Protrusion

Posted by Deborah Grauzam on

Hello!

 

I have a 13 month old with Down syndrome who has a significant tongue thrust swallow pattern and tongue protrusion. Her tongue is ALWAYS out of her mouth, far. Almost as if she is intentionally pushing it all the way out. She retracts her tongue when I place a straw in the corner of her mouth, place a puff on her molar ridge (and will maintain tongue lateralization for a short period), and when I place the elephant jiggler in her mouth. As soon as she attempts to control the puff with her tongue or swallow, her tongue pushes forward again. I can prompt her to retract her tongue at rest but it comes right back out. What else can I do? I only get to see her one time per month at this point. Mom sits in on sessions and carries over at home. Pediatrician and ENT have no concerns about size of tonsils; I have not observed them myself yet.

 

Aubrie

 

Hi Aubrie,

It sounds like you have been working really hard with this patient to address the tongue retraction.  Everything you are already doing sounds great.  I would add bubble blowing, horn blowing and chewing on the back molars (with cubes of food if able, z-vibe and the bite tubes). All of this will encourage tongue retraction in the mouth. The more you can work on the retraction the better.  

I hope this helps.

Please let me know if you have any other questions.

Thanks,

Elizabeth J. Smithson, M.S.P., CCC-SLP 

 

Elizabeth Smithson, MSP, CCC-SLP is a Speech-Language Pathologist who has over 10 years of professional experience working with infants, children, adolescents and adults. She earned her Master of Speech Pathology at the University of South Carolina. Liz is also a Level 5 TalkTools® Trained Therapist. She has received specialized training in Oral Placement Therapy, Speech, Feeding, Apraxia, Sensory Processing Disorders, and PROMPT©. Liz works with clients with a wide range of disabilities including Cerebral Palsy, Down Syndrome, and Spinal Muscular Atrophy.  She works through her own private practice Elizabeth Smithson Therapy, LLC in the home setting and in the TalkTools® office in Charleston, SC.

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Ask A Therapist: Tongue Tip Elevation in Moebius syndrome

Posted by Deborah Grauzam on

When people need help with therapy or products, we put TalkTools® Instructors to work and then publish the exchange for anyone in the same situation to get help, too. This question is from Danielle, by Facebook message.

Hello,

I was wondering if you could possibly help me. My six-year-old son has Moebius syndrome and recently had facial reanimation surgery. We have been doing TalkTools therapy for years and love it. We do a lot, from the Z-Vibe to Chewy Tubes to the horns! We have him try to follow the Z-Vibe with his tongue, but I can’t get his tongue to lift up. My question is: how can I help my son improve tongue movement? He has twelfth cranial nerve palsy, and his tongue has become so much stronger with therapy, but tongue tip elevation is still so hard for us. Any tips? Thanks so much for your help.

Danielle

Hi Danielle,

Here are some questions that may help us think about why he may be having difficulty. When we are looking for tongue tip elevation we need to know first if he has jaw stability, tongue retraction and tongue tip lateralization skills first; these are prerequisite movements we look for. If you are unsure of any of the terminology let me know!

1. Does your son get any lateral movement? If so is he getting lateral movement to both sides? What activities do you see this movement in?

2. Can he chew on his back molars and hold the food there? Do you see his tongue move toward the food as he chews? Does this look easy for him?

3. Can he drink from a straw with tongue retraction? (Or does he protrude his tongue forward)

4. Have you done the Jaw Grading Bite Blocks so we know that he has adequate jaw stability as well?

If you’d like to send a quick video clip doing some stimulation of his tongue I may be able to see something.

All questions that may help us get a “why” answer and maybe a plan! Also, if you haven’t already, you should read this article by Sara Rosenfeld-Johnson about Moebius Syndrome. I look forward to hearing from you and helping any way I can!

Renee Roy Hill, MS, CCC-SLP

Thank you so much for replying, I appreciate it more than you know. My son does have some lateral movement, but it is limited. He uses his fingers so much to move his food to his back molars and has always been a messy eater. When he drinks from a straw his tongue protrudes forward as well. Thank you for taking the time to help us.

Danielle

He still needs help with tongue retraction and lateral movement before working on elevation. He is not yet ready to work on elevation. Good luck with everything and let us know if you still need our help! 

Renee Roy Hill, MS, CCC-SLP

Renee Roy Hill, MS, CCC-SLP has provided therapeutic assessments and program planning for adults and children with oral placement, feeding and motor speech deficits for over 17 years. She is the owner of Crossroads Therapy Clinic in New Braunfels, TX and a member of the TalkTools® speakers bureau. Renee has been an invited speaker for ASHA state conventions and has received specialized training in speech/oral-motor/feeding therapy, Apraxia, sensory processing disorders, Hanen Courses, NDT training, TAMO therapy and PROMPT. She is the creator of the TalkTools® Schedule Board Kit, co-author of Ice Sticks, and author of the TalkTools® Apraxia Program.

Meet her!

  • February 10-11, 2017 in Pasadena, CA
  • February 23-25, 2017 in Austin, TX
  • March 3-4, 2017 in Mobile, AL
  • March 18-24, 2017 in the Caribbean
  • April 7, 2017 in Charlotte, NC
  • April 28-29, 2017 in New Orleans, LA
  • March 6-7, 2017 in Springfield, VA

For more details, visit TalkTools Event Calendar

 

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Ask A Therapist: The right duration of vibration

Posted by Deborah Grauzam on

Hello!

 

I have a question about using vibration (as with the Z-Vibe or Vibrator & Toothettes). I understand that using vibration can be used to "wake up" the sensory system, and I believe I’ve heard that it can have a temporarily positive effect on low muscle tone. I’ve read that vibration should be used in short durations, but I was wondering if you had any guidelines for the maximum or minimum duration of vibration? I’m thinking especially in a case of low muscle tone as in children with Down syndrome.

 

Thank you very much!

 

Jennifer

 

Hi Jennifer,

My name is Lori Overland and I teach the two day sensory-motor feeding class for TalkTools. Your email was forwarded to me, and it is an excellent question.

You cannot separate out the sensory and motor systems. Sensory feedback always impacts movement and movement provides feedback. It is important to make sure you have a specific motor goal (i.e.: in the case of spoon feeding, perhaps the goal is lip closure). Vibration facilitates a contraction of the muscle, so it may be used in conjunction with a tool to facilitate upper lip mobility for spoon feeding. If you leave vibration on a muscle for too long, the muscle relaxes. If you are using my pre-feeding exercises, I recommend  4-5 repetitions (maybe a little more or less depending on my client's sensory system) of an exercise. If you think about your motor goal and map sensory on to motor, you will not have to be concerned about using too much vibration. Feel free to email me if you have a follow up question.

Lori

 

Lori Overland, MS, CCC-SLP is a speech and language pathologist with more than 35 years of professional experience. Lori specializes in dealing with the unique needs of infants, toddlers, pre-schoolers and school-aged children with oral sensory-motor, feeding and oral placement/speech disorders. She has received an award from the Connecticut Down Syndrome Association for her work within this population. Lori consults with children from all over the world, providing evaluations, re-evaluations, program plans and week-long therapy programs. Lori also provides consults to local school districts and Birth-to-Three organizations. Her goal in addressing feeding and speech challenges is to improve the quality of life for both the children she serves and their families. In addition to her private practice, Alphabet Soup, Lori is a member of the TalkTools® speakers bureau. Lori has lectured on sensory-motor feeding disorders across the United States and internationally. Her classes, "Feeding Therapy: A Sensory-Motor Approach" and "Developing Oral-Motor Feeding Skills in the Down Syndrome Population" are approved for ASHA and AOTA CEUs. Lori is the co-author of A Sensory Motor Approach to Feeding. She holds degrees from Horfstra University and Adelphi University and has her neurodevelopmental certification.

Meet her!

- Oct. 14-15, 2016 for the workshop Feeding Therapy: A Sensory-Motor Approach in Cape Giraudoux, MO

- Oct. 29-30, 2016 for the workshop Feeding Therapy: A Sensory-Motor Approach in Minneapolis, MN

More dates at: TalkTools.com/Workshops

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Ask A Therapist: Using Vibration for Low Muscle Tone

Posted by Deborah Grauzam on

Hi TalkTools,

 

I have a question about using vibration (as with the DnZ-Vibe or Vibrator & Toothettes). I understand that vibration can be used to "wake up" the sensory system, and I believe I’ve heard that it can have a temporarily positive effect on low muscle tone. I’ve read that vibration should be used in short durations, but I was wondering if you had any guidelines for the maximum or minimum duration of vibration? I’m thinking especially in a case of low muscle tone as in children with Down Syndrome.

 

Thank you very much!

 

Riley

 

Hi Riley,

I’m Renee, a TalkTools® Instructor, and I would be happy to help you. This is an excellent question, I am asked this many times when teaching and working with clients!

You are correct, vibration can give the muscle more input and therefore often trigger a better motor response, thus “waking up” or “stimulating” the muscle to move. There are no specific “time” or duration guidelines for this. It is our responsibility as the therapist to look at the motor response while providing the input. So for some children with significantly low tone and an extremely under-responsive sensory system, it may take longer for the muscle to respond. But for a child who may have a better sensory system, the client may only need quick input 1-2x to see the motor response. It is important to remember what specific motor movement you are looking for and that the stimulation given is causing the appropriate reaction.

For example if I am providing stimulation to the lateral margin of the tongue to facilitate tongue tip lateralization to the back molars, once I see the movement, the vibration has done its job. Then I need to decide if my goal is repetitive movement using the vibration - leading me to possibly provide the input several times until I no longer see the tongue tip follow the stimulus - or possibly to quickly transition that movement to function (i.e. placing a cube of food on the back molar so the client then uses the movement in a functional way) which is my highest priority but sometimes not yet obtainable in my first sessions with the client.

Once I am sure of the goal of the vibration stimulation (what am I looking for in the motor system) it is easier to determine how long I should use it! The goal is always to eventually eliminate the vibration so that the movement is then stimulated through functional activities such as eating and speaking.

I hope this helps!

Renee Roy Hill, MS, CCC-SLP

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Ask A Therapist: Jaw Grading Bite Blocks and Dissociation

Posted by Deborah Grauzam on

Hello TalkTools,

 

I am Speech and Language Therapist working with an 11 year old with autism. He has a TalkTools® Program Plan, but I would value the opinion/support of one of your Instructors.

 

A significant priority at present is supporting him with dissociation of his jaw movements and then with grading. However, we have not been able to get a reliable bite on the Jaw Grading Bite Blocks. Interestingly, after about a month, he has achieved a bite/hold on the DnZ-vibe (not what I had initially planned that we would work on) with the vibration turned on. When the vibration is turned off, his bite is not so reliable. We are working at present on transferring the bite/hold to the #5 Jaw Grading Bite Block.

 

Do your instructors have any thoughts or experience with this? He does have complex sensory needs that are clearly factors in his eating, speech and other motor skills. I will certainly seek out advice from his Occupational Therapist once he has settled into a new school placement soon.

 

Many thanks,

 

Sally

 

Hi Sally,

I'm Robyn, a TalkTools® Instructor, and I've received your inquiry.

You are actually answering your own question, so great observation! This client needs more input to understand what's expected.

Hold the Bite Block in your right hand. With your left hand, hold a Jiggler in place on the top of the Bite Block and place at the correct spot as directed. I usually grab both tools with one hand and apply upward pressure on the mandible and say " bite and hold".

If this doesn't work, try reversing the hierarchy and working from 7 to 2 on the Bite Blocks, because the weakness may be in the high position. If there is a low jaw posture, sometimes reversing the order of the hierarchy is required.

I hope this helps!

Sincerely,

Robyn Merkel-Walsh, MA, CCC-SLP

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