Tagged "Speech Therapy"


Facebook LIVE w/ Throat Scope Founder & TalkTools Instructor

Posted by Casey Roy on

Throat Scope Inventor & CEO, Jennifer Holland, and TalkTools Instructor and Speech-Language Pathologist, Heather Vukelich, will be LIVE on TalkTools Facebook page to educate professionals on the uses of the Throat Scope in speech & feeding therapy and beyond.

This event is free.

Throat Scope in Speech/Feeding Therapy

TOPICS:

  • What is the Throat Scope?
  • Uses of the Throat Scope
  • Using the Throat Scope in Speech & Feeding Therapy
  • Jennifer & Heather discuss
  • Question & Answer from the LIVE audience... that's you!

When?
Thursday, November 8 at 11 p.m. Eastern Standard Time (United States).
Be sure to find out what this is in your local time zone!

Where?
On the TalkTools Facebook Page. Be sure to 'like' our page and RSVP to this event page to be sure not to miss out!

How?
Go to TalkTools Facebook page at the time of the event. Watching and participating in this LIVE video is free!

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3 Presentations at NDSC 2017!

Posted by Deborah Grauzam on

TalkTools was represented in 3 presentations at this year's National Down Syndrome Congress. Thank you all for attending!

Effective Strategies For Improved Communication and Speech Clarity for Children with the Diagnosis of Down syndrome

Presenter: Jennifer Gray, MS, CCC-SLP

Age range: Birth to 8

Course description:

This presentation will focus on effective communication strategies for children, birth to
school-aged, with the diagnosis of Down syndrome. Factors that impact appropriate
communication will be presented. Strategies will be discussed that foster speech and
language and prevent communication difficulties. Sensory, motor, and oral-placement
skills will be discussed in the framework of a comprehensive language learning system.
Parents and educators will better understand how multiple strategies can be implemented
to address speech clarity and overall communication.

Learning outcomes:

  • Identify the types of communication and which to target based on the child's strengths in daily living.
  • Learn specific activities and strategies to use at home with your child/client/student to encourage speech clarity and expressive language
  • Learn specific activities and strategies to use at home with your child/client/student to encourage speech clarity and expressive language

Airway, Orthodontics, Apnea, and Oral Placement Therapy

Presenters: Brian Hockel, DDS & Heather Vukelich, MS, SLP-CCC

Age range: All ages

Course description:

Posture and function of the jaw and mouth muscles will affect speech, facial and jaw development, and even the airway. As breathing and speaking are vital to health and personal development, you will want to learn in this presentation how to optimize your child's potential through addressing the common root causes of speech, orthodontic, and sleep apnea problems.

Learning outcomes:

  • To understand the etiology of facial and airway growth, and the implications for sleep apnea.
  • To introduce therapies such as Oral Placement Therapy that help speech and facial development.
  • To show orthodontic approaches which affect speech, facial appearance, and airway health.

Understanding Sensory Differences and How It Can improve Your Child's Quality of Life

Presenter: Monica Purdy, MA, CCC-SLP

Age range: Birth to 5

Course description:

The term “Sensory Differences” has been recently added to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 5th Edition (DSM-5®). Sensory differences can affect how each of us perform in therapy, school or their home setting. An individual’s sensory system is the foundation of his/her ability to interpret, process and react to the demands of the environment. Sensory differences affect every facet in an individual’s life – from eating, articulation, language, social and academic skills to self-care and play.

This course will allow participants to evaluate sensory differences, and gain new insights and perspectives toward your child, and even yourself. Understanding the importance of modulation, as well as under-responsive or over-responsive actions, will be the basis for guiding you and your child's therapist to have more success in every day interactions, as well as therapy sessions.

The importance of recognizing how your child may be processing information, and understanding which strategies and practices to implement will help your child both in therapy – and in life. The importance of working in conjunction with an occupational therapist will also be addressed.

Learning outcomes:

  • Define the term sensory processing disorder and determine how sensory processing affects your child
  • Identify the 8 senses and distinguish between typical and non-typical reactions to sensory input
  • Apply sensory activities to help the child/client achieve success
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#tbt: My Best Tips For Eliciting The K Sound

Posted by Deborah Grauzam on

This is a repost from Dean Trout’s Little Shop of SLP, with permission from the author.

Upon reaching out to her for permission, here's what Dean wrote: "I found TalkTools to be great for oral awareness and teaching segmentation of articulators!"

TalkTools | Dean TroutDean Trout worked for 31 years as a Speech Therapist in the public school system and for 4 years in her own speech clinic. She started 2 Gals Speech Products, LLC in 2007, spoke at several speech conferences and have been published in the ASHA Leader. Today she creates tangible things that she sells in her Etsy store as well as digital downloads in her TpT store"For you who are new to the field of SLP, I want to give tips and tricks to make your therapy more effective. ... For you more mature SLPs I want you to feel comfortable with technology and social media." 

April 10, 2017

TalkTools | K Sound (Dean Trout)I have often felt baffled as to why kids cannot produce /k/ when developmentally we make posterior sounds before anterior. Think about it, a baby’s first sounds are goo-goo and ga-ga, so isn’t /k/ just a naturally developing response? It makes me go, hmmm. Luckily there are several ways to go about teaching this sound. These tips are not in any particular order, so don’t think Tip #1 is the best. All these tips have been used successfully by several of my colleagues and me.  Please remember what works with one child does not always work with another. We are simply sharing some ideas of things to try.

TIP #1 Cue with “Clear out the Popcorn”

This tip is not EBP and I am not trying to pass it off as such.  I am just sharing an out of the box idea for when all else has failed.  In my many years of practice, I have found that the major reason a child cannot imitate a sound from our model and demonstration is simply that they don’t understand what we are telling them to do. They just don’t “get it.” It also seems that they more often than not just don’t get it when we try to show and explain how to do those sounds that are made in the back of our mouths: /k/, /g/, /r/. So to help them “get it” I try to relate the sound to something to which they are familiar. Most all of us have eaten popcorn and don’t we all, at times, get a husk caught on the back of our tongue and have to clear it out? That is what I use to help them understand what I mean by the back of the mouth or back of the tongue, etc. Every child I have had in therapy can show me with 100% accuracy where the front and back of the mouth is located on a drawing and can point to the front and back of their own mouths, but yet cannot put their own tongues there. To teach them how to find and lift the back of their tongues, we practice that horrible hacky-growly guttural sound we make when clearing out the popcorn. We do this until I feel they fully understand what I mean when I say use the back of your tongue. Once they “get it” you can shape it into a beautiful /k/ in isolation and begin your regular therapy. If they forget to get their tongue up when drilling syllables or words, just cue with “clear out the popcorn.”

If you really want to be the fun “speech teacher” why not bring some popcorn to eat in therapy? Just check for food allergies first ;)

TIP#2 Cereal

You can also get correct tongue positioning for /k/ using cereal-Cheerios or Fruit Loops. This approach is taught by Sara Rosenfeld-Johnson in her Talk Tools program. Basically, what you do is place the cereal behind the bottom front teeth and have the child place the tip of his tongue in the cereal hole and hold it there to keep the tip down while making the /k/ using the back of the tongue. This technique is explained in detail in the Talk Tools program. Here is the link to the website. http://www.talktools.com/ I highly recommend you learn how to implement this technique because it is effective. It is great for kids who front the back sounds and need the tactile cueing.

TIP #3 Tactile Cues—Holding the Tip and Blade

For years I have had kids to use their own finger to hold the tongue tip down to get the correct position for /k/ when they were substituting /t/ for/k/. Many times they will have to not just hold the tip but the tongue blade as well. You can start out with them holding only the tip down while they say /k/, but if they start making the /k/ with the blade of their tongue mid palate you will have to have them hold more of the tongue down and push the tongue further back in their mouths. This has been exceptionally effective at achieving a good /k/ sound. Many people do not like this approach, but if it works then I say use it. I have had some kids who have had to use their finger to hold their tongue down not only in isolation but through syllable and even a few into words (gasp)! However, never fear, I have never had a kid graduate from speech therapy and still have their finger in their mouth!! I never ask them to quit using their finger. They eventually get tired of using it and stop on their own. Don’t you think we sometimes worry too much about the little things?

When implementing this strategy if you are the one holding the child’s tongue via your own gloved hand, finger cot, or tongue depressor be careful of a hyper gag reflex. If you find a child with a hyper gag, you have two choices: 1) desensitize the gag reflex or 2) don’t use this approach. If the child can tolerate you inside his mouth a nice little tip is to use flavored toothpaste on a dental swab. It is just less invasive tasting.

TIP# 4 Use Gravity

Some children need a little more help learning to elevate the back of their tongue, and gravity helps! There are suggestions to have the children let their head lean over the back of their chair or have them lie on the floor. Personally, I have had no success with using the chair technique. I have had success doing therapy while the child is lying on his/her back on the floor. Initially, I just have the child lie on his back on the floor and do some deep breathing exercises to help him relax. I will sometimes lay a book on his stomach for this. They can see the book rise and fall as they breathe. After the child looks relaxed and at ease with lying on the floor, I begin therapy using the other techniques explained in this article. The one that seems to work the best is using tactile cues. I will start with a tongue blade and gently “push” the tongue tip down toward the back of the mouth. If this doesn’t work, I try having the child “cough” really hard, (similar to the clearing of the throat.) Usually, this combination of techniques works within one to two sessions, and we can go back to sitting in our chairs for therapy.

TIP#5 Getting Tongue Retraction

You cannot produce a /k/ without your tongue retracting back into the mouth. To achieve a tongue retraction response, stimulate midline of the tongue from anterior to posterior with a tongue depressor or your gloved finger. Pam Marshalla explains this very well on the websitehttps://pammarshalla.com/stimulating-tongue-back-elevation-for-k-and-g/

I suppose this sums up every tip and trick we have up our sleeves. Hopefully, this has affirmed that what you’re doing is right or maybe even got you to thinking it is ok to try something off the wall in therapy.  I am all for Evidence-Based Practice but sometimes when all else has failed you must try something unique.  It just might work for this particular student.  

I will not discuss or debate EPB, so no need to leave heated comments. 

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Tongue Ties and Speech Sound Disorders: What Are We Overlooking?

Posted by Deborah Grauzam on

“The conversation for tongue tie in the speech pathology community is growing louder among some groups of speech-language pathologists (SLPs) (ASHA Leader, 2015). An ASHA literature search has suggested a correlation between tongue ties and difficulty producing lingual alveolar phonemes (Merkel-Walsh & Jahn, 2014). Furthermore, Eschler, Klein, and Overby (2010) indicated that SLPs’ diagnostic criteria, treatment, goals, and discharge criteria for ankyloglossia differ depending on comorbid behavior (i.e., SSDs or feeding/swallowing difficulty).

Recently, there is a rise in the identification of posterior tongue ties in infants who are having trouble feeding and toddlers/adolescents who are exhibiting continuous speech sound errors despite years of speech-language pathology services. Posterior ankyloglossia is characterized by a thickened frenulum (Type III) or a submucosal frenulum visualized as a flat, broad mound absent of any typical protruding frenular tissue, and restricts movement at base of tongue (Type IV) (Kutlow, 2011).”

Meaux, A., Savage, M., & Gonsoulin, C. presented the poster “Tongue Ties and Speech Sound Disorders: What Are We Overlooking?” at the 2016 Annual ASHA Convention, November 17-19 in Philadelphia, PA.

View the full poster here

Authors: Ashley Meaux, PhD, CCC-SLP, Meghan Savage, PhD, CCC-SLP, & Courtney Gonsoulin, MA, CCC-SLP

TalkTools | Tongue Ties and Speech Sound Disorders

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Preventing Vocal Burnout in Future Teachers: An Education & Prevention Program

Posted by Deborah Grauzam on

Did you know that 51.2% of Teachers sought medical care for voice disorders? That $2.5 billion was spent annually on sick leave and treatment of voice disorders of teachers?

Hume & Wegman elaborate on this subject on their poster "Preventing Vocal Burnout in Future Teachers: An Education & Prevention Program," that was presented at the 2016 Annual ASHA Convention, November 17-19 in Philadelphia, PA.

View the full poster here

Authors: Sue B. Hume, PhD, CCC-SLP & Allison Wegman, MS, CCC-SLP, The University of Tennesse, 2016.

hume-wegmans-2016-asha-poster

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