Tagged "oral motor performance"


ASHA Convention is next week! Come see us at Booth 423, Sessions 1205 & 1689 ;)

Posted by Deborah Grauzam on

TalkTools | ASHA 2016

Who's excited for the annual American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Convention next week? The convention is happening November 17-19 in Philadelphia, PA. We are ready to blow your mind both at presentations and at booth #423 and serve you the best we can!

THE BOOTH

At the booth, you will be able to view and handle all TalkTools' signature products, such as the Horn Kit, the Straw Kit, the Honey Bear, the Bite Blocks and more. Any order placed at the Convention will receive a 20% OFF discount and FREE shipping (most orders will even be fulfilled right there)!!!

Anyone visiting the booth can be entered for our raffle featuring Introduction to OPT Kits ($195 value), Online Courses ($30 to $220 value), Amazon gift cards ($250 value) and more! Just come and have your badge scanned. There will also be free bracelets, pens, chocolate and more for everyone ;) And you will be able to be photographed dressed as a super hero  at our super cool photo station to celebrate your successes in speech & feeding therapy.

Another reason to stop by our booth is to chat with TalkTools experts! Lori Overland, MS, CCC-SLP, C/NDT, Robyn Merkel-Walsh, MA, CCC-SLP, Monica Purdy, MA, CCC-SLP & Colette Ellis, M.ED., CCC-BCS-S will be on hand to answer your therapy questions and discuss your Continuing Education opportunities.

THE PRESENTATIONS

TalkTools is scheduled for two presentations that you don't want to miss, Thursday afternoon and Saturday morning.

"Diet-Shaping for Self–Limited Diets in Children With a Diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder"

Session Code: 1205 Thursday, November 17, 4:30 PM - 5:30 PM Location: Pennsylvania Convention Center Room: Terrace Ballroom IV Presenters: Robyn Merkel-Walsh, MA, CCC-SLP & Lori Overland, MS, CCC-SLP, C/NDT Instructional Level: Intermediate Abstract Type: Professional Education Speech-Language Pathology Topic Area: Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders

Abstract: Presentation explores 1) the etiology of self-limited diets in autism; 2) the sensory-motor system as it relates to feeding; 3) sensory processing and how it affects the diet; 4) the importance of establishing home–base when conducting a feeding program and 4) diet–shaping based on a sensory-motor approach to feeding.

Learner Outcomes: 1. Improved understanding of the etiology of a self-limited diet 2. Demonstrate understanding of a home-based diet 3. Comprehend the concept of diet-shaping

"Careful Hand Feeding or Comfort Feeding Evaluations: Techniques in Palliative Dysphagia Management"

Session Code: 1689 Saturday, November 19, 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM Location: Pennsylvania Convention Center Room: 204A Presenter: Colette EllisM.ED., CCC-BCS-S Instructional Level: Intermediate Abstract Type: Professional Education Speech-Language Pathology Topic Area: Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders

Abstract: Review the speech-language pathologist’s role of traditional dysphagia management versus palliative and end of life care. Review primary and secondary recommendations made when there is known risk of aspiration. Address ethical questions SLPs face regarding dysphagia management. Instructing professionals or caregivers in careful hand feeding techniques will be introduced.

Learner Outcomes: 1. Describe the difference between traditional speech pathology services and those available during palliative care 2. Demonstrate the consultant role, service and communication needed during palliative care 3. Apply sensory motor techniques which can facilitate ‘careful hand-feeding’ if this is an option chosen by the patient with severe feeding difficulties and dysphagia

See you in Philadelphia!

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How this researcher took a step toward clinicians: Ray D. Kent, PhD's latest findings

Posted by Deborah Grauzam on

Recently, Ray D. Kent, PhD has published a review article entitled "Nonspeech Oral Movements and Oral Motor Disorders: A Narrative Review," in the American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2015, Vol. 24, 763-789. In this article, Kent proposes careful definitions and task descriptions to analyze if nonspeech oral movements have substantial clinical value to oral motor disorders.

This is important to us, as TalkTools® strive to help speech and feeding disabilities using oral motor exercises. More specifically, we call our method Oral Placement Therapy. To learn more, visit our page What is OPT?

Ray D. Kent, PhD is Professor Emeritus at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He has published over 150 articles and reviews, and is the author of The MIT Encyclopedia of Communication Disorders, among other books and manuals.

Kent defines NSOMs as "motor acts performed by various parts of the speech musculature to accomplish specified movement or postural goals that are not sufficient in themselves to have phonetic identity." At TalkTools®, we have a passion for challenging the NSOME "nay sayers."  Our argument is that OPT is a modern extension of Van Riper’s Phonetic Placement Therapy (PPT), and uses tactile cueing to help individuals who cannot respond to visual-verbal treatment cues. We have seen numerous client successes since we began implementing this technique, and believe it is not just a good luck streak. There is enough evidence available in the form of clinical data, and parent, client and clinician testimonials, to warrant open discussions on the value of nonspeech oral movements. However, as Kent pointed out, the lack of definition and clarity clouds the evidence. This is why we are thrilled by this step from a researcher toward clinicians.

"Muscles do not transform themselves as they perform one task or another."

Here are a few excerpts from Kent's review article: "Although it was initially assumed that specific language impairment is not related to problems in other areas such as motor development, recent research points to the contrary conclusion. Children with language disorders or dyslexia often present with atypical motor skills." As Kent puts it, "muscles do not transform themselves as they perform one task or another." Actually, "speech production involves more than 100 muscles located in the trunk, neck, and head." But the issue is that "rather little attention has been given to the interplay with motor control, although motor performance is intrinsic to the task [of speech]."

Kent also mentions in his review article specific diagnoses that have been proven to benefit from NSOMs. "Among the therapeutic components that a speech-language pathologist might address are efforts to increase awareness of the muscles and postures of the orofacial system and to improve muscle strength and coordination (American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. (2011). Speech language pathology medical review guidelines). Presumably, NSOMs are one means to achieve these objectives. Although research on clinical outcomes from orofacial myology is not extensive, promising reports have been published on speech production in cerebral palsy (Ray, J. (2001). Functional outcomes of orofacial myofunctional therapy in children with cerebral palsy. The International Journal of Orofacial Myology, 27, 5-17) and adult dysarthria (Ray, J. (2002). Orofacial myofunctional therapy in dysarthria: A study on speech intelligibility. The International Journal of Orofacial Myology, 28, 39-48)." He later adds: "oral motor performance also appears to be a predictor of verbal fluency in individuals with autism."

Additionally, Kent writes that "the learning of a motor skill proceeds through stages," hence the hierarchical approach of TalkTools® Therapy, such as the Horn Hierarchy, the Bubble Hierarchy, or the Straw Hierarchy. He adds that nonspeech motor exercises should be used as one component of therapy, and we agree that this should be an essential component to consider when practicing Oral Placement Therapy.

In conclusion, research is still needed to follow Kent's work in proofing the value of NSOME, but therapy services should not be denied to clients on the ground that these techniques are not developed enough in literature. Many times, TalkTools® Trained Therapists have won cases where a client was denied the necessary therapy on this ground. We hope more researchers will follow his path toward clinicians' work.

If you are interested by this subject, read Diane Bahr and Sara Rosenfeld-Johnson's article "Treatment of children with speech oral placement disorders (OPDs): A paradigm emerges" in Communication Disorders Quarterly, 31, 131-138 (quoted by Kent), where the authors study the case of children who do not respond to traditional speech therapy techniques. Robyn Merkel Walsh and Sara Rosenfeld-Johnson also recently published on this topic and have found similar conclusions to Kent's in the literature. In a recent interview with Jeff via the podcast Conversations in Speech, Robyn Merkel Walsh discusses as well how years of clinical data is a form of Evidenced Based Practice.

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